It’s time we cut all this red tape ourselves

It's time we cut all this red tape

Image: Pixabay.com

It had taken a year to organise the required paperwork to make the move from the Netherlands, and finally I was here, about to start my job in a remote hospital.

However, the manager on the other side of the desk had other ideas. She looked at me over her glasses and shook her head. I wasn’t allowed to work, she said, because my Medicare provider number would take another month to come through.

Of course, this was just the beginning. After a few years working in the bush, I was thrilled to qualify for a permanent Australian residence visa. But first I had to pass the international English language test — again.

“G’day mate, do you really need me to come to the big smoke?” I asked a clerk at some department over the phone. “I’m flat out looking after this mob in the back of Bourke. I passed that exam ages ago, before I came to the Lucky Country. Surely me Strine hasn’t got worse since I’ve been here. Crikey, the rellies back home reckon I have a dinky-di Aussie accent.”

Needless to say, I had to sit the English test again.

Red tape bugbears

This was a decade ago, but things haven’t got any better. The GPs Down Under (GPDU) Facebook group, a new, quickly growing online community of Australian GPs and registrars, listed their ‘red tape bugbears‘ earlier this month.

The amount of time and energy GPs waste filling out forms and jumping through bureaucratic hoops is gobsmacking.

One GP recently posted on the GPDU Facebook page: “For practices employing a new rural doctor, there are at least 14 different forms across Commonwealth and State jurisdictions. Some have to be completed online, some need to be scanned, some mailed — yes, with a stamp. And some faxed.”

Hospital bureaucracy is also a big bugbear for many GPs. For example, in Queensland the public hospitals have an extensive referral ‘criteria’ for each department. GP referrals that don’t tick their boxes – often checked by non-medical staff – are simply refused.

One orthopaedic outpatient department doesn’t accept a referral until GPs have faxed a completed three-page ‘hip and knee questionnaire’.

Other health professionals can also add to the GPs’ burden when they selectively take over parts of our job under the notion of helping to reduce our workload.

But it doesn’t always work out that way as one GP on the GPDU site recently highlighted when she told of how her local pharmacy happily manages her patients’ warfarin doses, but only as long as the INR is within a safe range.

“Apparently this service is more ‘convenient’ as well as lucrative for the pharmacist. Until the INR level is more than 2.5. Then, late Friday afternoon, the pharmacy demands I manage the warfarin dose. So then it’s suddenly my problem,” she posted.

Knee-jerk reaction

Red tape is often a knee-jerk reaction to a problem and not usually the best solution.

An estimated 25,000 patient consultations are lost every month while doctors are waiting for PBS Authority call centre operators to answer the phone. Meanwhile, our Medicare-funded sick certificate ceremony is estimated to cost the Australian economy $3 billion a year.

It’s time we did something about it.

Collaboration with other professions and organisations is more important than ever. If we help hospitals solve some of their outpatient department problems, our workflow will improve too. GPs need to negotiate innovative solutions that are mutually beneficial and acceptable. Building relationships, communicating and networking are the key to success.

We are in an ideal position to show leadership. This means we have to organise ourselves better, learn to be good followers, and support those who are trying to build bridges, including our peak organisations. No doubt we will occasionally have to compromise and, in some instances, lift our game.

I realise this is not easy in the current climate of cuts and freezes, but if we fail to do this, others will continue to take control of primary care. I love Australian general practice – it’s a great profession and the reason why I came to Australia. But we must protect what’s good and make it future-proof.

My call to action to colleagues, the colleges and the AMA is simple: please use your extensive experience and influence to make things easier for all parties involved.

This article was originally published in Australian Doctor Magazine.

Follow me on Twitter: @EdwinKruys.
Disclaimer and disclosure notice.

One thought on “It’s time we cut all this red tape ourselves

  1. What baffled me most about Australia attracting Dutch GPs is the enormous bureaucratic barrier, totally putting people off. I visited the recruitment offices in Cairns, Brisbane, Sydney and Tasmania and was surprised by their size. Strange that every district has its own office to lure GPs and other doctors abroad nearly in competition. A waste of money, ineffective and discouraging.
    Strange because every trained GP walking in is a million euro entering Australia. Holland lost Edwin, because he had the perseverence and wit to get through.
    As his trainer I regretted his departure and for that reason maybe Australia should stay bureaucratic.

    Liked by 2 people

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