Warning: digital challenges ahead

Warning: digital challenges ahead

There were a few interesting tech news facts this week. I thought this one was pretty crazy: a Dutch campaign group used a drone to deliver abortion pills to Polish women, in an attempt to highlight Poland’s restrictive laws against pregnancy terminations.

There was scary news too: a private health insurer encouraged its members to use a Facebook-owned exercise app to qualify for free cinema tickets. Not surprisingly, Facebook was entitled to disclose all information shared via the app, including personal identity information, to its affiliates.

But there was also this: Telstra has launched its ReadyCare telehealth service. For those willing to pay $76, a doctor on the other end of the phone or video link is ready to care for you. No need to visit a GP or emergency department.

The telecom provider will offer the service to other parties like aged-care facilities and health insurance funds. Telstra is aiming for a $1 billion annual revenue.

Digital revolution

Digital developments increasingly create new opportunities, challenges and risks, but we have yet to find ways to incorporate the new technologies in our existing healthcare system.

In an interview in the Weekend Australian Magazine Google Australia boss Maile Carnegie warned that the digital revolution has only just started and that Australia is not ready for the digital challenges ahead.

Carnegie said that 99% of the internet’s uses have yet to be discovered and although Australia is the 12th largest economy in the world, it ranks only 17th on the Global Innovation Index.

She said that Australia has become a world expert at risk-minimisation and rule-making. Unfortunately this seems to slow down innovation.

“We are either going to put in place the incentives and the enablers to create the next version of Australia as a best-in-class innovation country or we’re not,” she said. “And I think it’s going to be a very stark choice that we have to make as a community.”

Who’s taking the lead?

In the last ten years we have seen major progress in for example mobile technology, but my day-to-day work hasn’t changed much. Healthcare has difficulty harnessing the benefits of the digital revolution.

Is the industry leading the way and letting governments, software developers and other parties know what is required? Do we have industry-wide think tanks to prepare for the near future? Have we listened to what our patients need and expect from us in the 21st century? And will Medicare eventually reimburse services delivered via modern technologies, such as pioneered by Telstra?

Lots of questions. Who has the answers?

Follow me on Twitter: @EdwinKruysDisclaimer and disclosure notice.

3 thoughts on “Warning: digital challenges ahead

  1. ” Australia has become a world expert at risk-minimisation and rule-making”….but Australians want everything to be “safe” and the guvmint to get more involved…is this not true ?

    Like

    • I think it would be good if we can cut some of the excessive regulation and red tape that is paralysing many industries. But you’re quite right, it’s all about finding the right balance isn’t it?

      Like

  2. Pingback: Weekly Australian Health IT Links – July 6, 2015 – Auto Article - Weekly Australian Health IT Links - July 6, 2015

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