The Danish health IT solution: small-scale brilliance

Danish Health-IT

When his wife attended a conference in Copenhagen, Adelaide GP and RACGP board member Dr Daniel Byrne took the opportunity to find out why Denmark is one of the world leaders in the use of e-health.

One of Australia’s problems is the reliance on paper documents. For example, almost every healthcare organisation designs their own referral forms and we still fax and post a lot of documents. In Denmark a ‘one-letter solution’ was introduced years ago: one electronic form used by thousands of health organisations.

“No patient ever left the surgery with any paper,” said Dr Byrne. “It seemed very well organised with a great e-health network. No faxes were used as everything is connected via secure networks – prescriptions, referrals, pathology and radiology ordering, even email consults.”

E-mail consultations

Dr Daniel Byrne

Dr Daniel Byrne about the Danish e-health system: “The live medication list was too good to be true.” Image: Linkedin.

There are no incentives for Australian GPs to communicate with their patients by phone and email, whereas Danish GPs are paid to to take calls from patients every morning. They are also paid for e-mail communications with patients.

Dr Byrne: “The email consults are excellent. The patient has to send their email via a government secure email system. Every citizen in Denmark has a government email address – maybe similar to our MyGov system.”

“Only simple non urgent requests are done by email. I think the GP has three days to answer. The payment was around $10 per email for the GP and this seemed to work fine. If there is a bit of to and fro with a patient via email the GP asks the patient to come in for a proper consult.”

Shared medication record

National databases exist for medications and laboratory results. Dr Byrne: “The live medication list was too good to be true! Click on the medication list in any GP software or hospital system and within 2-3 seconds up pops the same real-time live medication list.”

“The GP I was with could see the prednisolone dosing schedule for a patient with polymyalgia from hospital and then just take over future prescriptions. Everyone is working off the same list. I am sure it is not perfect but a pretty good starting point compared to our nothing.”

It appears the system encourages continuity of care. After hours medical services use the same computer system as GPs and hospital discharge summaries arrive electronically at the GP surgery within two days. Scripts are sent electronically to the patient’s preferred pharmacy.

Patient access

Compared to many other European countries Denmark has a high public satisfaction with the health care system.

An interesting aspect is the access patients have to the system. Via the Danish National Health Portal patients can access hospital discharge information, laboratory results, the live medication list and waiting list information.

Patients can electronically schedule GP appointments, send e-mails to their GP and renew prescriptions. They can also see who has accessed their health records.

All doctors are allowed to access the health records, but other health professionals require patient consent first. Danish law does not allow the interconnection of IT systems across sectors, such as health and taxation.

Conclusion

With a population of 5.6 million Denmark is one of the smaller European countries, which may make it easier to roll out e-health. The system is not perfect and there are, as always, some issues such as interoperability.

Overall Denmark seems to be miles ahead of many other countries, including Australia where we still rely heavily on the fax machine. Dr Byrne: “In Denmark it is illegal to fax anything as the system works on a national ID number that has to be kept secure.”

Dr Daniel Byrne would like to thank his Danish host Dr Ynse de Boer.

Follow me on Twitter: @EdwinKruysDisclaimer and disclosure notice.

Sources:

4 thoughts on “The Danish health IT solution: small-scale brilliance

  1. IMO, the system in Australia should start with Public Hospitals. The Feds can mandate a national hospital ehealth system as a prerequisite for funding and the States can then design and roll out the system. The patients will have to use it, and the clinicians on a wage will be paid to use it. This will get rid of paper based hospital records and improve medication and other errors. Patients can access their records, ending the ‘mushroom era’ of public hospital inpatients. This will then give a critical mass of patients and curated data for the private sector to hook into, much like a website can be accessed and used from several browsers. My 2c!

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  2. Sounds like a good start for e-health records. No mention in the article about whether its opt-in or opt-out. Would also be good to know how easy it is to register – the Australian system IMO is very complex and appears to be a huge barrier to adoption, hence the low take up rate to date. Agree with Dr Tellis and further suggest that we should start with medications and on-line discharge summaries (given the recent publicity about readmissions caused by post-discharge medication issues) and then add further modules and practitioner users’ records from there. The users need to gain confidence in an e-records system and then broaden its scope rather than trying to design a comprehensive and complex system that very few are willing to attempt to use.

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