5 reasons why the Medicare rebate freeze is bad policy

Medicare rebate freeze

When I tweeted about the Medicare freeze last week, someone replied and asked “Care to explain other than meaning you get less money?”

I thought it was a really good question as it highlights the complexity of the issue. Most people seem to think that it’s all about doctors’ income – but it isn’t. The Medicare rebate is also about the money patients get back from Medicare.

As we speak, around Australia GP practices are adjusting their fees as a result of the government policy. Our practice increased the fee of a basic consultation with five dollars for people without a concession card. Other practices have decided to charge a once-off $30 payment to previously bulkbilled patients.

I expect that if the freeze is not lifted these amounts will have to go up again soon.

Greedy doctors?

Everything gets more expensive over the years, including the cost of running a medical practice – think for example about rent and employing receptionists and nurses. If GP practices would not up fees, their Medicare rebate income would drop with 7.1% by 2017-2018!

Medicare freeze

Over the years more and more services will require an out-of pocket payment by patients, including pensioners and healthcare card holders. Rural doctors expect that bulkbilling in the bush will soon be a thing of the past.

But the freeze has also affected urban areas. That’s why the the RACGP and AMA have labelled the government policy a ‘copayment by stealth’.

Five arguments

The freeze is bad policy and should be reversed for five reasons:

1. Many practices will stop bulkbilling. This means higher out-of-pocket costs for patients. As a result fewer people will visit the doctor in the early stages of a disease. This will often make treatment later on more difficult, more stressful and more expensive.

2. The policy disproportionately affects disadvantaged people who cannot afford a copayment. Research shows that increased out-of-pocket costs stop people from going to the doctor.

3. The freeze undermines important Australian values such as equity of access and therefore encourages a two-tier health system.

Some argue that a copayment would cut unnecessary use of medical services. But higher out-of-pocket-costs will not weed out unnecessary visits. Many of my colleagues know that often their sickest patients will not seek medical care if it becomes more expensive.

4. Research indicates that areas with poor access to GP services have higher hospital costs. It is likely that more people will visit places where healthcare is free, such as already overloaded public hospitals and emergency departments. Dr Google will become more popular too!

5. Practices continuing to bulkbill will have to change their business model: doctors need to see more patients per hour, or practices will have to hire less staff which will affect service. Some practices will close their doors – such as Dr Adrian Jones, a Redfern GP who decided to close his practice as the margins were getting too small.

Is the freeze a necessary policy?

Medicare is not unsustainable. This is a false argument by the government. In fact, Federal Health Minister Susan Ley admitted at the national AMA conference: “The Government is not claiming we’re in a healthcare funding crisis.”

Australian healthcare performs well in comparison to other countries. The increase in health expenditure in general practice has been slow, and in line with overall economic growth and GDP.

Freezing the patient Medicare rebate will not make healthcare more efficient or reduce waste in the system. It’s just bad policy.

Support the campaign against the rebate freeze: download and send a protest letter.

Follow me on Twitter: @EdwinKruysDisclaimer and disclosure notice.

5 thoughts on “5 reasons why the Medicare rebate freeze is bad policy

  1. Good short article that explains the problem. It seems common sense to me that expenses go up such as staff wages & rent and I thought everyone would realise this. After all expenses go up for everyone else.
    People may think it is a small amount but when a already struggling person has to pay a bit extra here and bit extra on medication and a bit extra on a dozen other things it actually adds up to a lot of money.

    Doctor’s Bag what I would be interested in hearing is when was the last time or last two times the medicare schedule fees actually increase?

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