Overcoming tribalism in healthcare – opening speech at #iGP16

Tribalism in healthcare

When I was preparing this session I thought I’d tell you something about what the RACGP does. But it’s so much, where to start?

So I thought I’d tell you a joke instead.

Five doctors went duck hunting one day. Included in the group were a general practitioner, a pediatrician, a psychiatrist, a surgeon and a pathologist.

After a while, a bird came winging overhead. The first to react was the GP who raised his shotgun, but then hesitated. “I’m not quite sure it’s a duck,” he said, “I think that I will have to get a second opinion.” And of course by that time, the bird was long gone.

Then another bird appeared in the sky. This time, the paediatrician drew a bead on it. He too, however, was unsure if it was really a duck in his sights and besides, it might have babies. “I’ll have to do some more investigations,” he muttered, as the creature made good its escape.

Next to spy a bird was the sharp-eyed psychiatrist. Shotgun shouldered, he was more certain of his intended prey’s identity. “Now, I know it’s a duck, but does it know it’s a duck?” The fortunate bird disappeared while the fellow wrestled with this dilemma.

Finally, a fourth fowl sped past and this time the surgeon’s weapon pointed skywards. BOOM!!

The surgeon lowered his smoking gun and turned to the pathologist beside him and said: “Go see if that was a duck, will you?”

The tribal jungle

Two years ago our keynote speaker was the amazing Dr Victoria Brazil, emergency physician and medical educator from the Gold Coast. She spoke about tribalism in our profession and said:

“I think we actually work in a tribal jungle in healthcare.”

She was right. We make jokes about the characteristics of the other tribes, like I just did, but tribalism is still one of our biggest challenges today. We are concerned about fragmentation in healthcare – but what about the divisions within our own ranks?

Part of what makes general practice attractive is its diversity, but it is also a weakness. Think, for example, of the stereotypical dichotomies: generalists vs partialists, private practice versus corporates, rural versus metropolitan etc.

I’m not saying we should be one big happy family, but why not focus more on what we have in common?

There is hope: participants of groups like United General Practice Australia and, here in Queensland, the GP Alliance, have shown a desire to put aside tribal differences and work towards common goals. This is a start, and initiatives like these must further strengthen the voice of general practice in the near future.

Investing in general practice

With the Federal Budget due to be handed down this coming Tuesday, this weekend also serves as a timely reminder of the RACGP’s advocacy campaign to reverse the freeze on Medicare rebates. As part of our pre-budget submission to the Federal Government, we outlined 4 key strategies that will improve quality-led patient care.

In order to provide quality healthcare services, MBS rebates must be in line with the cost of doing so. More than 80% of the Australian population is seen by GP’s each year but only 8% of Government healthcare spending is allocated to general practice.

New data presented in the flagship report from the National Health Performance Authority released this week, shows that people who do not see a GP have a 30% higher chance of visiting an emergency department.

Investment in primary care will result in long-term health savings and reversing the freeze on MBS indexation is a must. The College will continue to represent our members and lobby the government on this very important issue.

A challenge for you

The theme of this RACGP Queensland Conference is ‘the future’. So here’s a challenge for you:

You don’t have to go duck hunting with your colleagues, but what can you do to reduce tribalism?

If you decide to take up this challenge, do one thing, one little thing, and start this weekend while you are amongst your peers.

If we want the future to be different, if we want to see different results, we should do things differently.

Opening speech given at RACGP Queensland’s 59th Clinical Update Weekend: iGP, General Practice into the future.

Follow me on Twitter: @EdwinKruysDisclaimer and disclosure notice.

Source joke: Nursing Fun

3 thoughts on “Overcoming tribalism in healthcare – opening speech at #iGP16

  1. “With the Federal Budget due to be handed down this coming Tuesday, this weekend also serves as a timely reminder of the RACGP’s advocacy campaign to reverse the freeze on Medicare rebates.”

    In the budget tonight it has been announced that the rebate freeze has been extended another two years, to 2020. So the RACGP’s advocacy campaign hasn’t worked. It has made things worse.

    Tribalism is alive and well and it is time for the RACGP to try a different tactic. Non VR rebates have been frozen for 27 years, and yet most Non VRs are no longer on the lower A2 rebates. Non VRs are the only group who not only unfroze their rebates, but got them doubled as well.

    Perhaps it is time the RACGP joined forces with the Non VRs and asked how they managed to unfreeze their rebates?

    Like

  2. I will immediately seize your rss feed as I can’t find your e-mail subscription link or e-newsletter service.
    Do you’ve any? Please allow me realize in order that I may subscribe.
    Thanks.

    Like

I'd love to hear from you! Please leave a comment:

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s