It is time to leave the Machiavellian era of Australian healthcare behind

Community pharmacy groups are lobbying for pharmacy prescribing, a topic that has been on the wish list for a long time. Medical groups are concerned about patient safety and fragmentation and are pushing back. Is this Australian conflict model what we want or is there a better way forward?

Some pharmacists want to be able to write prescriptions as they believe it is in the scope of practice of a pharmacist and more convenient for patients.

Examples from abroad are used as an argument why Australia must follow suit. A ‘collaborative prescribing pilot’ is underway and the pharmacy sector is looking forward to the soon-to-be released results.

Pharmacists expect that their proposal will be cost-saving as people will not need to see the family doctor for prescriptions.

Pushback

Not surprisingly, medical groups are upset and believe the proposal is not helpful and not in the best interest of patients.

Doctors are concerned that soon the head doesn’t know what the tail is doing or, in other words, that more prescribers will lead to more fragmentation and adverse health outcomes.

Concerns have been raised that warning signs or significant (mental) health conditions will be missed and screening opportunities lost. Some have also argued that pharmacists prescribing and selling medications at the same time creates commercial conflicts of interest.

As a result there will likely be pushback from medical groups. It is to be expected that when the debate heats up some unpleasant words will be said in the media before the Health Minister of the day makes a decision based on evidence, opinion or political expedience.

Then there will be a loser (usually not the Health Minister) and a winner, and the relationship between pharmacists and doctors remains sour at the expense of patient care.

A better way

This series of events has become a familiar scenario in Australian healthcare. What’s missing is of course a joint strategy or a solution that would benefit both parties as well as our patients (a win-win-win solution).

Community pharmacists play an essential role within primary care teams. The pharmacy sector is under pressure and is attempting to implement strategies to remain viable into the future, such as introducing services currently provided by doctors, nurses and others.

An obvious way forward would be for pharmacists and doctors to explore models that are not competitive but complement each other. This is a joint process that requires broad support from both parties.

We desperately need genuine collaborative models of care, such as pharmacists working in general practice, but there may be other models too.

This is of course easier said than done. It is, however, time to leave the Machiavellian era of Australian healthcare behind. Who’s going to take the first step?

3 thoughts on “It is time to leave the Machiavellian era of Australian healthcare behind

  1. How about Pharmacists are able to prescribe ongoing medications when previous long term prescriptions have been initiated by a doctor BUT the medication must be dispensed at an unrelated pharmacy?

    Like

  2. Well written Edwin. This is a difficult space in which to engage and is fraught with high emotions. I think you’ve articulated the message quite well. Fundamentally, we need to shift this conversation into arguing around interests rather than positions as our good friends Roger Fisher and William Ury would say. You may be aware of some of the work WentWest Western Sydney PHN is doing in this space.

    Like

I'd love to hear from you! Please leave a comment:

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.