About

Welcome & thanks for visiting Doctor’s Bag – the health blog that often gets a mention in the media – and a place to discuss all things General Practice.

I live and work in the hinterlands of the Sunshine Coast, Queensland.

When I’m not working I spend time with my family or blog about healthcare. The views expressed here are my own, unless stated otherwise.

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Feel free to leave a comment, send an email or contact me via Twitter or LinkedIn. I appreciate feedback, but I may not publish inappropriate, offensive or anonymous comments.

Thanks for sharing and contributing.

Edwin Kruys

Last updated 06 November 2017.

7 thoughts on “About

  1. Pingback: Looking after asylum seekers – who is crossing the line? | Doctor's bag

  2. Love your blog eh! I am a Canadian family doctor and former Emergency physician in Cambridge, a city of 150,000, 100 km west of Toronto.
    Currently minus 20 degrees and 1 metre of snow outside. We spell it metre due to the French influence in Canada.
    I have been to Brisbane and the gold Coast twice. My son took his masters in teaching at Griffiths University for 18 months and we visited at Christmas 10 years ago. First time I have seen a life guard wearing a Santa hat. I have never seen huge shade tents in car parks like in Oz. We don’t have a problem with heat unfortunately.
    I love your country and wish it was closer.
    As family doctors we have it really good here. We average over $300,000 US dollars per year net and work a 40 hour week. No benifits or pensions. Our on call is once a month.
    We get 8 weeks paid vacation per year so most of us head south in winter or west to ski in the Rockies or east in Quebec wher it is 40 below and your beer freezes if you put it between the storm windows.
    Our summers are hot and we love our cottages and huge fresh water lakes which have ocean going vessels on them.

    Doctors, hospitals, labs and imaging are free, there is no co-pay. There is no private medicine. My homeless patients get the same care as my millionaires as it should be.
    Drugs have a $2 co-pay for seniors and the poor and 90% of patients have a private drug plan. The few working poor without a drug plan get free samples.

    The only thing bad about our system is the long waits as you would expect from a free lunch.
    We see a lot of trivial stuff too but you get used to it after 42 years.

    An MRI or CT takes 2 months to get. It takes 5 months to see a urologist, orthopod or gastroenterologist. It takes 9 months to see a shrink. (9 minutes if you threaten suicide)
    It takes 10 months to see an obstetrician. Just kidding.

    This is stressful for us GP’s as the patients want us to help them jump the queue. I tell them to complain to the politicians.

    Our hospitals are overflowing and back up into the ER which can have 4 hour waits. (4 minutes if you are a true emergency which is 20%).

    All and all I love my life as a Canadian doctor as do most of my peers.

    I have a blog in The Medical Post like yours and will send the link with the next entry.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Pingback: Electronic Health Records in the UK: Patient Access Remains a Hot Topic

  4. As we have known for some time, the MyHR legislation explicitly allows the data to be used for reasons other than health care. GPs have seemed to be blissfully unaware that their own medical records may legitimately be accessed by any and all of their peers/colleagues.
    Under current the MyHR “opt-out” paradigm, everyone will actually have a record created, even if they opt out, only it will be “hidden” on opt out. The security of this hidden record is not guaranteed. We seem not to have the option to have it not created.”

    Can you able to follow up these concerns in your blog?

    Cheers
    Juanita

    Like

  5. Pingback: E-health warning: cliff edge ahead | Doctor's bag

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