Overcoming tribalism in healthcare

When I was preparing this session I thought I’d start by telling a joke:

Five doctors went duck hunting one day. Included in the group were a general practitioner, a pediatrician, a psychiatrist, a surgeon and a pathologist.

After a while, a bird came winging overhead. The first to react was the GP who raised his shotgun, but then hesitated. “I’m not quite sure it’s a duck,” he said, “I think that I will have to get a second opinion.” And of course by that time, the bird was long gone.

Then another bird appeared in the sky. This time, the paediatrician drew a bead on it. He too, however, was unsure if it was really a duck in his sights and besides, it might have babies. “I’ll have to do some more investigations,” he muttered, as the creature made good its escape.

Next to spy a bird was the sharp-eyed psychiatrist. Shotgun shouldered, he was more certain of his intended prey’s identity. “Now, I know it’s a duck, but does it know it’s a duck?” The fortunate bird disappeared while the fellow wrestled with this dilemma.

Finally, a fourth fowl sped past and this time the surgeon’s weapon pointed skywards. BOOM!!

The surgeon lowered his smoking gun and turned to the pathologist beside him and said: “Go see if that was a duck, will you?”

The tribal jungle

Two years ago our keynote speaker was the amazing Dr Victoria Brazil, emergency physician and medical educator from the Gold Coast. She spoke about tribalism in our profession and said:

“I think we actually work in a tribal jungle in healthcare.”

She was right. We make jokes about the characteristics of the other tribes, like I just did, but tribalism is still one of our biggest challenges today. We are concerned about fragmentation in healthcare – but what about the divisions within our own ranks?

Part of what makes general practice attractive is its diversity, but it is also a weakness. Think, for example, of the stereotypical dichotomies: generalists vs partialists, private practice versus corporates, rural versus metropolitan etc.

I’m not saying we should be one big happy family, but why not focus more on what we have in common?

There is hope: participants of groups like United General Practice Australia and, here in Queensland, the GP Alliance, have shown a desire to put aside tribal differences and work towards common goals. This is a start, and initiatives like these must further strengthen the voice of general practice in the near future.

Investing in general practice

With the Federal Budget due to be handed down this coming Tuesday, this weekend also serves as a timely reminder of the RACGP’s advocacy campaign to reverse the freeze on Medicare rebates. As part of our pre-budget submission to the Federal Government, we outlined 4 key strategies that will improve quality-led patient care.

In order to provide quality healthcare services, MBS rebates must be in line with the cost of doing so. More than 80% of the Australian population is seen by GP’s each year but only 8% of Government healthcare spending is allocated to general practice.

New data presented in the flagship report from the National Health Performance Authority released this week, shows that people who do not see a GP have a 30% higher chance of visiting an emergency department.

Investment in primary care will result in long-term health savings and reversing the freeze on MBS indexation is a must. The College will continue to represent our members and lobby the government on this very important issue.

A challenge 

The theme of this RACGP Queensland Conference is ‘the future’. So here’s a challenge for you:

You don’t have to go duck hunting with your colleagues, but what can you do to reduce tribalism?

If you decide to take up this challenge, do one thing, one little thing, and start this weekend while you are amongst your peers.

If we want the future to be different, if we want to see different results, we should do things differently.

Opening speech given at RACGP Queensland’s 59th Clinical Update Weekend: iGP, General Practice into the future. Source joke: Nursing Fun

5 reasons why the Medicare rebate freeze is bad policy

When I tweeted about the Medicare freeze last week, someone asked “Care to explain other than meaning you get less money?”

I thought it was a really good question as it highlights the complexity of the issue. Most people seem to think that it’s all about doctors’ income – but it isn’t. The Medicare rebate is also about the money patients get back from Medicare.

As we speak, around Australia GP practices are adjusting their fees as a result of the government policy. Our practice increased the fee of a basic consultation with five dollars for people without a concession card. Other practices have decided to charge a once-off $30 payment to previously bulkbilled patients.

I expect that if the freeze is not lifted these amounts will have to go up again soon.

Greedy doctors?

Everything gets more expensive over the years, including the cost of running a medical practice – think for example about rent and employing receptionists and nurses. If GP practices would not up fees, their Medicare rebate income would drop with 7.1% by 2017-2018!

Over the years more and more services will require an out-of pocket payment by patients, including pensioners and healthcare card holders. Rural doctors expect that bulkbilling in the bush will soon be a thing of the past.

But the freeze has also affected urban areas. That’s why the the RACGP and AMA have labelled the government policy a ‘copayment by stealth’.

Five arguments

The freeze is bad policy and should be reversed for five reasons:

1. Many practices will stop bulkbilling. This means higher out-of-pocket costs for patients. As a result fewer people will visit the doctor in the early stages of a disease. This will often make treatment later on more difficult, more stressful and more expensive.

2. The policy disproportionately affects disadvantaged people who cannot afford a copayment. Research shows that increased out-of-pocket costs stop people from going to the doctor.

3. The freeze undermines important Australian values such as equity of access and therefore encourages a two-tier health system.

Some argue that a copayment would cut unnecessary use of medical services. But higher out-of-pocket-costs will not weed out unnecessary visits. Many of my colleagues know that often their sickest patients will not seek medical care if it becomes more expensive.

4. Research indicates that areas with poor access to GP services have higher hospital costs. It is likely that more people will visit places where healthcare is free, such as already overloaded public hospitals and emergency departments. Dr Google will become more popular too!

5. Practices continuing to bulkbill will have to change their business model: doctors need to see more patients per hour, or practices will have to hire less staff which will affect service. Some practices will close their doors – such as Dr Adrian Jones, a Redfern GP who decided to close his practice as the margins were getting too small.

Is the freeze a necessary policy?

Medicare is not unsustainable. This is a false argument by the government. In fact, Federal Health Minister Susan Ley admitted at the national AMA conference: “The Government is not claiming we’re in a healthcare funding crisis.”

Australian healthcare performs well in comparison to other countries. The increase in health expenditure in general practice has been slow, and in line with overall economic growth and GDP.

Freezing the patient Medicare rebate will not make healthcare more efficient or reduce waste in the system.

Medicare freeze

What health consumers want: interview with Leanne Wells

Generating consumer-led ideas to improve the health system – that’s what the Consumer Health Forum is all about, says new CEO Leanne Wells. Health consumerism around the world is changing, and Leanne sees a potential for big reforms in Australia. I asked her about a range of topics, including the Medicare rebate freeze, the RACGP draft vision for a sustainable health system, funding and the role of pharmacists.

“It is a terrific honour and challenge to be leading this organisation at a time of significant developments in the role of health consumerism globally,” she says. “I believe in a strong patient-clinician alliance.”

“Consumer leadership is as important as clinical leadership in developing modern health systems that reflect the importance of patient-centred care. We can achieve this by working together to influence policy settings, design and operation of health care.”

Consumer-led ideas

What health consumers want: intervie with Leanne Wells
Leanne Wells: “Integration has to be the name of the game given modern health care is about managing multi-morbidity and complexity.”

“Our members include a diverse range of consumer organisations as well as professional associations, researchers and individuals with an interest in health consumer affairs. Through our membership network, we reach millions of Australian consumers.”

“CHF is all about generating consumer-led ideas for a better health system. It is the pre-eminent national organisation advocating on behalf of health consumers on policy issues pertaining to Medicare, PBS and population health and on issues such as health system development, access to best available consumer-centred care and access to medications.

“CHF’s work has included research and national campaigns on rising out-of-pocket health costs and prescription medicine costs. We deal frequently with questions from media on issues such as health insurance and quality and safety in health care.”

“There is potential for significant changes in Australia’s health system, particularly in Commonwealth-financed areas such as Medicare, primary health care and mental health, at a time when there are moves to put focus on reforms to Commonwealth-State health funding issues. In all of these areas, consumer-generated ideas for a better system will be crucial to success.”

Medicare rebate freeze

“CHF has supported the RACGP and others in the campaign against the rebate freeze. Nothing should compromise good quality, comprehensive, co-ordinated patient care. I support the concept of the patient-centred healthcare home.”

“Some consumers have capacity to pay a co-payment and will do so if they feel they get value. Others simply won’t go to the doctor if they are not bulk billed – and often those who don’t go to the doctor due to cost barriers are those from lower socioeconomic circumstances which we know are associated with higher rates of complex, chronic conditions: the very conditions that need ongoing, co-ordinated care. The issue highlights the need for the MBS review and a rethink of the way we finance primary care. Both are long overdue.”

“General practices need the flexibility to be truly responsive to their patient populations

“CHF seeks funding that is determined by the right models of care, not the other way around. At the moment we’ve got a system that is largely based on fee-for-service financing to drive and, at times, limit models of care.”

“General practices need the flexibility to be truly responsive to their patient populations. The expansion of health insurance to primary practice, may offer benefits in terms of better integrated care for some. The overall impact however is likely to be negative, setting up a two-tiered health system at the primary care level where insured patients would be likely to get preferential treatment.”

“The RACGP’s draft consultation paper ‘Vision for a sustainable health system’ makes the case for an alternative blended payment model offering flexibility and autonomy to respond better to contemporary care needs. The paper would be stronger if it articulated a vision for general practice emphasising how that could be done.”

“The paper lacked consideration of aspects of integrated care and placed ‘general practice’ rather than ‘the patient’ at the centre of the health system. We would have liked the paper to place greater emphasis on the patient as partner and on the consumer benefits of team-based care as well as the other non-financial levers that can work in concert to bring about change and innovation in general practice.”

Consumers as partners

“A big challenge is for health care to be much more consumer-centred. That works best when there’s a team of professionals looking after the consumer, when there’s an open flow of information and discussion between them about the patient’s needs and how to meet them together rather than separately.”

“We want to see a patient-centred approach to providing care – not disease-centred or system-centred

“Above all else patients want professionals who see them as more than just the ‘vessel’ of a disease to be cured, or a problem to be solved. Patients want to be recognised for who they are: unique individuals with their own unique lives. We want to see a health workforce which takes a patient-centred approach to providing care – not disease-centred, not system-centred, but patient-centred.”

“The National Safety and Quality Health Service Standards have consumers as partners in care as its second standard – solid recognition that this value must become inherent to the culture and operation of health services. Primary Health Networks have a pivotal role in bringing this about.”

“Having worked with divisions of general practice and Medicare Locals since the 2000s, I remain a strong proponent of the place ‘meso’ structures like these have in the system. The Primary Health Networks have great promise as disruptive innovators in our system.”

“With their distinct boundaries, alignment with hospital networks, relationship with general practice and the knowledge they will grow about their local communities, they are well placed to work with patients and clinicians to lead service and system development and innovation.”

“But they can only do this if they have mandate, the support and participation of patients and clinicians and the financial flexibility to invest in new approaches and new models of care.”

Dysfunctional state-federal funding

“The CHF supports a single level of government taking responsibility for leadership in health policy. We are diverse country with distinct regional communities. I believe moving to a single level of government, with regional purchasers administering pooled funding, is a concept worth exploring further.”

“The only way we are going to integrate the system is by having policy set nationally, and service commissioning undertaken regionally by single entities. Integration has to be the name of the game given modern health care is about managing multi-morbidity and complexity. Removing the dysfunctional nature of state-federal funding would surely be an improvement on what we have now.”

Devaluation of general practice

“Patients need to be seen as partners in care – assets not deficits. I agree that general practice and its place in the health system has become devalued over time. It is a very efficient and effective setting in which to deliver care close to where consumers live and work.”

“I applaud the RACGP’s efforts to get general practice better recognised and valued

“I applaud the RACGP’s efforts to get general practice better recognised and valued. However, in the campaign video, the doctor is represented as the sage authority while the patients are represented as passive recipients of the doctor’s view of them and their lives.”

“The characterisation was at odds with all the evidence showing that approaches which encourage patient-centred and patient-engaged care produce better outcomes. This aspect of the doctor-patient relationship could have been better reflected.”

Pharmacists and General Practice

“CHF supports a stronger role for pharmacists in general practice in areas such as medication support. It would be in the patient’s interest for general practice to have non-dispensing pharmacists as part of the team available to advise on quality use of medicines, hopefully freeing up GPs to focus on time-consuming, complex cases requiring medical expertise.”

“Expanding the scope for dispensing pharmacists to provide medical advice in pharmacies would also be supported by CHF provided the role was strictly within the pharmacist’s qualifications, was coordinated with the patient’s GP or local GP and where necessary, the services performed in a private area. Both options are good ways to make better use of an existing valued workforce.”

Patients or consumers?

“There is a continuing debate on the patient-consumer dichotomy. We prefer the use of the word ‘consumer’ when talking in terms of the health system generally. In that context we think the word consumer more accurately expresses the non-dependent status of a citizen and customer of health services and products.”

“The word ‘patient’ is appropriate when referring to an individual under treatment of a clinician where the patient’s outcome is directly dependent on the clinician.”

The Medicare freeze: A storm is coming

Health Minister Sussan Ley said at the annual AMA conference in Brisbane that the Government is not claiming we’re in a healthcare funding crisis.

At the same time dark clouds are gathering as the frustration about the patient Medicare rebate freeze rises.

The Medicare rebate is the amount patients get back from Medicare after they visit their doctor. This amount is supposed to go up every year to compensate for inflation and higher costs. The government has frozen the annual indexation for four years.

The Consumers Health Forum said in its analysis of the latest Budget: “The retention of the $1.67 billion freeze in Medicare payments to doctors may mean many patients are likely to face higher medical bills.”

The Guardian reported: “The AMA president, Brian Owler, used his opening address on Friday to call for both sides of politics to lift the ‘damaging’ freeze which could force GPs to start passing costs on to their patients, amounting to a so-called co-payment by stealth.”

And: “The federal government could face another fierce campaign from one of the nation’s most powerful lobby groups if it does not lift its freeze on doctors’ rebates before the next election.”

The RACGP has also indicated that it would consider a new campaign. It looks like we’re going to get some fireworks again.