How do you put up with this, doc? Red tape in medical practice

“How do you put up with this, doc?” She looked at me while I was on the phone. We were waiting for almost ten minutes.

Every time she comes in we go through the same ritual: I ring the PBS Authority hotline, we wait, sometimes for a couple of minutes, and sometimes longer – like today. I always get approval, and then print off the script for her. In the meantime other patients are waiting in the waiting room or trying to get an appointment.

According to the AMA thirty per cent of medical practitioners reported spending ten minutes a day or longer waiting for calls to be answered. So here we are: we have a shortage of doctors and we make them jump through bureaucratic hoops instead of seeing patients.

An estimated 25,000 patient consultations are lost every month while doctors are making phone calls to the PBS Authority hotline. At the same time various reviews have shown that this procedure is unnecessary and does not lead to any savings.

I was very pleased to see the Australian Medical Association submission to the National Commision of Audit earlier this month. The AMA states in the introduction:

Though there has been some recent progress in reducing regulatory burdens in a few areas of medical practice, the amount of regulatory burden and red tape remains excessively high without any real justification. Internal AMA research shows that a large number of GPs spend up to nine hours or more each week meeting their red tape obligations. Every hour a GP spends doing paperwork equates to around four patients who are denied access to their doctor.

The submission focuses on six areas:

  1. PBS phone authorisations.
  2. Medicare provider numbers
  3. Medicare payments
  4. Personally Controlled Electronic Health Records (PCEHR) registration for medical practices
  5. Centrelink and Department of Veterans’ Affairs documentation requirements
  6. Chronic Disease Management items under the MBS

Although there are lots of other areas that need improvement, this seems like a good start.

NEHTA is coming to town

“Be a yardstick of quality” ~ Steve Jobs.

First of all, many thanks to the GPs, registrars, practice managers, journos and eHealth-specialists who made suggestions how to move the eHealth-records system forward.

The original comments can be found here. It’s an excellent read and summarises the sticky PCEHR-issues from a clinician point of view.

On Friday afternoon I received a phone call from NEHTA (National E-Health Transition Authority). Their clinical leads are coming to Geraldton to discuss the PCEHR. Our team of doctors and managers is getting ready. We have invited the AMA, and they’re flying in to Geraldton as well.

It will be good to hear first-hand why it is so hard to make the system more acceptable to clinicians – and for our clinical team to give feedback. But the main question is: will NEHTA and the Department of Health go back to the drawing board and change what needs to be changed to get clinicians on board?

It’s late, but hopefully not too late to make the PCEHR work for everybody. If there’s anything you want us to bring up (apart from the wish list mentioned above), feel free to leave a comment below and we’ll pass it on.

Why we vaccinate: amazing figures from Australia

These graphs show what happens to the number of deaths when we start vaccinating.

The red arrow indicates when vaccines were introduced in Australia. The take-home message: vaccines save lives.

Why we vaccinate
Image (click to enlarge): Number of deaths in Australia from diseases now vaccinated against, by decade (1926–2005). Red arrow indicates when vaccine was introduced. Source: The Science of Immunisation: Questions and Answers, Australian Academy of Science.

For more information have a look at the website from the Australian Academy of Science which provides easy-to-understand information that explains the science of immunisation.