10 podcasts for GPs (and their patients)

I always enjoy a good podcast. There is something appealing about listening to people’s stories via the cloud – and at a convenient time and place. I usually listen in the car on the way to work.

In 2014 I posted 6 great podcasts for primary care, one of the most visited articles on this blog. As podcasting seems to be more popular then ever and new podcasts for family doctors have been launched since my last post, it is time for an update (October 2018).

So here is my top 10. Since I’ve been involved with the BridgeBuilders podcast (shamelessly placed @ no.4) my respect for podcasters has grown even more; it takes many hours to edit one episode.

Click on the iTunes or SoundCloud logo to listen, and feel free to share your favourites in the comments section. Big thanks to all podcasters – keep going!

#1: The Good GP

The Good GP

The Good GP has been around since September 2016 and has grown into one of the most popular education podcast ‘for busy GPs’, hosted by Western Australian GPs Dr Tim Koh and Dr Sean Stevens, in collaboration with RACGP WA.

Guests are GPs or other specialists and a range of mainly medical topics is covered, for example: acute pain, allergies, immunisations, the future of general practice, euthanasia and the registrar -supervisor relationship.

Listen on iTunes or SoundCloud

#2: The GP Show

This is another popular medical education podcast – hosted by Queensland GP and medical educator Dr Sam Manger.

Sam interviews guests covering a wide variety of topics including case studies and guideline reviews. The podcast is aimed general practitioners, family physicians, other specialists, allied health, nurses, registrars/residents, medical students and anybody interested in health, science and medicine.

Listen on iTunes or Libsyn

#3: Just a GP

Just a GP is a popular newcomer in 2018, run in collaboration with RACGP New South Wales. Hosts Dr Ashlea Broomfield, Dr Charlotte Hespe and Dr Rebekah Hoffman discuss leadership, quality in clinical practice, self care and wellbeing, difficult consultations, starting or running a private practice and GP research.

They explore the layered complexities with each other and other GPs with expertise in these areas. In each episode they share a favourite resource or clinical pearl.

Listen on iTunes or SoundCloud

#4: BridgeBuilders

Hosted by Dr Edwin Kruys, Dr Ashlea Broomfield and Dr Jaspreet Saini, the themes of the BridgeBuilders podcast are collaboration in healthcare, fragmentation, team care and working together to the benefit of our patients.

A wide variety of guests, including some of our healthcare and thought leaders from e.g. the RACGP, ACRRM, Consumers Health Forum (CHF) and the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia (PSA), give their view on trust, integrated care, quality care, leadership and what needs to happen to make Australian healthcare an even better connected place.

The BridgeBuilders podcast was launched in 2018.

Listen on iTunes or SoundCloud

#5: GP Sceptics

GP ScepticsSuperstar GPs Dr Justin Coleman and Dr Liz Sturgiss team up to ‘dissect, analyse and sometimes trash’ medical research relevant to GPs.

A common theme in their broadcasts is the influence of the pharmaceutical industry and other big corporates on doctors and our health.

Liz and Justin have a good sense of humour and recommend their podcast to ‘sceptical clinicians and their patients’.

Listen on iTunes or SoundCloud

#6: The Medical Journal of Australia

The Medical Journal of Australia (MJA) needs no introduction. Listen to interviews with leading health professionals and authors of MJA articles.

Listen on iTunes

#7: Broomedocs Podcast

Broome GP & emergency doctor Casey Parker has been podcasting since 2012. He discusses topics related to emergency medicine and (procedural) general practice . In the Broomedocs journal club relevant research studies are critically appraised, often with guests.

Listen on iTunes

#8: The Health Report

The Health ReportThe Health Report by Norman Swan and other ABC reporters features health topics such as ‘fishy fish oil’, insomnia, asthma, chiropractic controversies, the cranberry myth and lyme disease. Often several national and international guest discuss various topics in one episode.

Listen on iTunes

#9: BS without the BS

Best Science Medicine PodcastThe Best Science (BS) medicine podcast is a Canadian show which critically examines the evidence behind commons drug therapies. GP and associate professor Michael Allan and professor James McCormack present many myth busters and topics relevant to general practice, such as the treatment of back pain, osteoporosis and common cold.

Listen on iTunes

#10: Inside Health 

A BBC podcast discussing several topics per episode with UK GP Dr Mark Porter, demystifying myths about everything health: vitamins, supplements, obesity, smoking, organ donation, and much more.

Listen on iTunes or SoundCloud

An earlier version of this post was published in March 2017.

5 ingredients for effective collaboration

Collaboration can be very rewarding. It is often talked about but not easy to achieve, and it doesn’t always make the top of the priority list.

Although it’s not the solution to everything, effective collaboration can be a source of satisfaction and has the potential to make work, and life, more fun. Of course, collaboration does not mean that we have to agree on everything.

I’d like to share some thoughts on the ‘ingredients’ of successful collaboration:

#1: Letting go of control

No one is as smart as all of us, said Ken Blanchard. It’s ok to not have all the answers. In collaborative cultures outcomes are largely dependent on organic group processes. It is important to empower others and trust in the wisdom of the group and diversity of thought.

#2: Celebrating diversity

Interesting things happen when people bring different backgrounds, disciplines, skills and ideas to the table. We need to be open to a dialogue that celebrates differences. This is not always easy as our tendency is to engage with like-minded people.

Diversity improves decision-making as it stimulates critical evaluation and prevents groupthink. Diversity also means accepting that we can have differences of opinion.

#3: Aiming for mutual benefit

In collaborative cultures mutually beneficial solutions become more important than winning and personal gain. We need to attend to the needs of all parties and not just our own.

Consensus improves the quality of decision-making through genuinly addressing individual concerns. Asking questions and finding out what outcome the other party needs is key to finding common ground for agreement.

#4: Formulating shared values or goals

Often we want to jump to the ‘how’ without having explored the ‘why’. Universal values are motivating! They answer the why question and are the reason we get out of bed in the morning. Providing excellent care to our patients is an example of a universal value/goal most of us share.

#5: Building relationships

If we focus on outcomes without investing in relationships, there is a good chance that we will fail. Building trust and relationships are key components of effective collaboration. This is never a once-off tick-box exercise but should be an ongoing activity.

This post was originally published on BridgeBuilders.

How to upgrade an organisation’s tribal culture

Immature tribal cultures create silos and distrust, and sustain undesired behaviours. How can we change a dominant culture and become more effective?

My mother spent years of her childhood in Tjideng, a Japanese internment camp for women and children run by the cruel Captain Kenichi Sone.

She was born in the former Dutch East Indies, now Indonesia. The Dutch occupied and exploited the country for over four hundred years, but in 1942 things changed dramatically as a result of the Invasion by the Japanese imperial army.

The women in the Japanese internment camps are sometimes called the ‘forgotten women’ of the war in the East. These camps, as well as Dutch colonialism, are some of the worst examples of tribalism.

Tribalism comes of course in many shapes and forms including, as we all know, in the medical world.

Tribes & organisations

Most leaders know that tribal cultures are a key factor in the performance of organisations. Some leaders are experts at creating close-knit cultures, but only a few can change a culture that doesn’t perform optimally.

Tribalism is the natural way we organise ourselves into social groups. Our ‘tribes’ are part of who we are. They offer support, security and a sense of belonging an there’s nothing wrong with that.

However, tribalism can also refer to a false sense of superiority, sometimes leading to exclusion, bullying and discrimination.

We can change a dominant tribal culture and upgrade our organisations to more collaborative, healthy stages. History shows that goal-oriented groups and organisations that work well with others are more successful.

5 tribal cultures

In the book ‘Tribal leadership’, Professor David Logan et al describe five stages of tribal culture. As he points out, the medical profession is only half way, at stage three of five.

Five tribal cultures
The five tribal cultures. Source: Tribal leadership. David Logan, John King, Halee Fischer-Wright 2011

Logan’s tribal stage one is the mindset of gangs and war criminals – people who come to work with weapons. There is hostility and violence and no cohesion.

People working in a stage two culture may have coffee mugs with slogans like: “I hate work,” or “I wish it was Friday”.

There is often a high suspicion of management and authority in general, and team-building efforts are not effective in this culture.

Stage three is the dominant culture in almost half of all organisations, including many professional workplaces. Quite often doctors fall into this category. In stage three it is all about personal success and being the smartest. Stages four and five are the collaborative cultures.

Let’s have a closer look at the most common culture, stage three.

I’m great (and you’re not)

The mantra of stage three is ‘I’m great’, often followed by the unspoken words ‘and you’re not’. There’s a long history in medicine of stage three cultures with a strong focus on individual expertise and success.

Anatomy lesson
The Anatomy Lesson of Dr Nicolaes Tulp, by Rembrandt. Source: Rembrandt Huis.

One of the earliest examples I could find is this well known Rembrandt painting titled, ‘The anatomy lesson of Dr Nicolaes Tulp.’

Dr Tulp was a highly respected surgeon in Amsterdam in the seventeenth century; he is clearly the central figure in this painting. He’s the only one wearing a hat. Sadly but not surprisingly there are no women present.

You could argue that this scene demonstrates the dominant culture of the exclusive Amsterdam Guild of Surgeons. These days, almost four hundred years later, the dominant culture in medicine hasn’t changed all that much.

Professionals working in a stage three culture are often very good at what they do as individuals but what they don’t do is bringing people together.

They may think they are. Interestingly people in stage three often think that they are at one of the collaborative stages. They may talk about collaboration and teamwork – hallmarks of stage four and five – but their actions firmly put them in stage three.

The issue with a stage three culture is that it cannot be fixed – it can only be abandoned. The solution is to move your tribe to the next stage, stage four.

How to upgrade

People working in a stage four culture don’t talk about themselves. They first start listening. It’s no longer about being the smartest or about personal success.

There’s a move from ‘expert’ to ‘partner’. The language used is not “I’m great” but “We’re great”. There’s tribal pride.

Eventually, later in stage four, organisational boundaries become less important and cross-pollination between organisations may occur.

So how do we upgrade our culture from stage three to the more collaborative stage four? Logan describes several principles, including:

  • Focus your team on tribal success instead of personal success
  • Point out the superior results of stage four tribal cultures
  • Describe role models in the organisation that show stage four behaviour, for example people who are talking about ‘we’ instead of ‘me’
  • Encourage transparency and sharing of knowledge & information as much as possible.

There’s one main problem with stage four, reflected in the unspoken sentence that often follows “We’re great,” and that is: “… and you’re not,” referring to other groups or organisations. That’s where stage five comes in.

Stage five is the dominant culture in two percent of work places. In this stage there is no ‘they’.

‘Them & us’ thinking has gone out of the window and there is a focus on inspiring purposes. These are often universal values, taking away the need to compete.

People working in stage five cultures can work with any group that has a commitment to universal core values – even if these values are different from their own.

Effective followership

More collaboration in medicine has many benefits, including for direct patient care, mental health of doctors and healthcare reform.

We always talk about leadership but effective followership is just as important.

Effective followers don’t blame their leaders when things don’t go as planned; instead they offer support and gently, but persistently, steer their leaders in the right direction to help them achieve the organisational goals.

What the medical profession needs is people who build bridges.

I’d encourage you to review your own organisation(s) and look for opportunities to collaborate. Don’t accept non-collaborative cultures.

Find role models and like-minded people, people who talk about ‘we’ instead of ‘me’, and together take your dominant culture to the next level.

This is an adaptation of a presentation given at GPDU18.

Why doctors should work closer with patient organisations

Historically, campaigns against bad government health policies have been predominantly doctor-centric. And the usual government response is to divide doctors and patient organisations.

Many politicians have mastered playing the ‘greedy doctor’ card, which is an effective way of making doctors’ objections seem less trustworthy.

A while back, I interviewed the influential patient advocate Jen Morris for my blog. Ms Morris is a researcher in healthcare quality and safety at the University of Melbourne.

Patient–doctor alliance

We spoke about the untapped power of the patient–doctor alliance. She strongly feels that we can achieve so much more in Canberra if patients and doctors joined forces more often.

“At a strategic level, it’s a numbers game,” she said. “There are approximately 26,000 GPs in Australia, and about 82,000 registered medical practitioners. But there are over 23 million patients. That is an enormous bloc of voters and lobbyists to leave untapped.”

The RACGP’s ‘You’ve been targeted’ campaign earlier this year against the co-pay plan was an example of what happens if patients stand united with GPs to protect primary care. The Consumers Health Forum of Australia (CHF) issued a joint press release with the RACGP and the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine to reject the co-payment scheme. The RACGP’s change.org online petition had obtained 44,800 signatures within a week.

Other organisations including the AMA followed suit. The broad approach seemed to have an impact, first in the media and eventually in the corridors of power, and GP co-payment and extended level A consultations were dropped.

More recently, the RACGP, the Royal Australasian College of Physicians, and the CHF partnered in a joint submission to the Federal Health Minister regarding the deregulation of pharmacy locations and ownership.

Concerns

Although these are great developments, there are also concerns. What if our goals are in opposition?

Take for example the PCEHR. Patient organisations want full control of the data, which makes it less useful as a clinical tool for doctors.

Understandably, there is scepticism from both sides. Patient organisations may be wary of working with powerful medical organisations setting the agenda. Patients may feel that doctors are not genuinely interested in their opinions. Doctors on the other hand may be concerned about increasing demands and consumerism.

Morris: “It is important to remember that disagreement doesn’t only pose an obstacle in ‘patients and providers’ scenarios. Neither patients nor providers are homogeneous groups, and we do well to remember that. It is worth asking how providers approach the problem when they disagree on an issue or project, and source lessons from that.”

So, the answer lies in building trusting relationships. GPs are good at this on an individual level. It is one of the strengths of general practice. We should be doing the same at an organisational level. Working closely with patient organisations will improve the mutual understanding of our values and beliefs.

According to Ms Morris, we should be looking for common ground. More often than we acknowledge, patients and doctors are really advocating for the same outcomes. But too often, she added, we don’t take the time to really analyse where the crux of disagreement actually lies. Morris: “(…) if we find that the aims of doctors and patient organisations are so distinct as to be deemed incompatible, we should be re-evaluating those aims urgently.”

‘Them and us’

Of course, the ‘them and us’ thinking also occurs between providers. This can be confusing for patients and third parties including government organisations. For that reason, I’m a great believer in the power of United General Practice Australia. It is made up of the main GP groups, including the colleges, the rural groups, the AMA, registrars and supervisors and the divisions network. These organisations have shown a desire to collaborate and put aside their differences.

A similar structural working relationship should be developed between doctors and patient organisations. This alliance should exist not just to respond to new developments, but also to proactively set out a future course and lobby governments accordingly. It would make primary care less vulnerable to the rapidly changing preferences and priorities of the government of the day.

It is good to see the willingness from both sides to work together, and I hope it is the beginning of a fruitful collaboration in years to come. We must harness the potential power of the patient–doctor alliance to protect what’s good and, where needed, improve the care for our patients.

This article was originally published in Australian Doctor Magazine.

The untapped power of the patient-doctor alliance

Traditionally campaigns against poorly thought-out Government policies have predominantly been doctor-centric, and the usual Government response is to divide consumer and medical organisations.

Jen Morris is a patient advocate and researcher in healthcare quality and safety at the University of Melbourne. She feels strongly that cooperation is required if we want to make more impact in Canberra.

This makes sense. It looks like the time is right for a novel approach – and it is much needed too, as the discussion about healthcare so far has been about dollars instead of quality. What are the benefits of a patient-doctor alliance and how do we overcome our differences?

Jen Morris
Jen Morris: “If doctors and patients can capitalise on common ground and present a united front from the outset, the weight of political force will rest with us.”

The numbers game

“At a strategic level, it’s a numbers game,” says Jen Morris. “There are approximately 26,000 GPs in Australia, and about 82,000 registered medical practitioners. But there are over 23 million patients. That is an enormous bloc of voters and lobbyists to leave untapped.”

“When campaigns are too doctor-centric, that leaves this bloc ‘in play’ – sparking a spin and PR war between doctors and the government, vying for public support. But if doctors and patients can capitalise on common ground and present a united front from the outset, the weight of political force will rest with us.”

“More importantly, putting patients and their care at the centre of pro-healthcare campaigning recognises healthcare exists wholly for, and because of, patients. Sometimes, public debates amplify some of the worst features of traditional hierarchies in clinical healthcare. Authority figures argue over who knows what’s better for patients, and best represents their interests.”

“All the while, patients pushed to the sidelines quietly await a chance to speak for themselves. If we’re serious about changing the culture of paternalism in healthcare, and empowering patients, that change in approach needs to permeate right through from the consulting room to the campaign platform. ”

What if we disagree?

There may be topics where patients and health providers don’t agree, such as certain aspects about the PCEHR. This can really paralyse a project. How should we approach this?

Morris: “It is important to remember that disagreement doesn’t only pose an obstacle in ‘patients and providers’ scenarios. Neither patients nor providers are homogeneous groups, and we do well to remember that. It is worth asking how providers approach the problem when they disagree on an issue or project, and source lessons from that.”

“It’s worthwhile looking for points of common ground, and building upon those

“The possibility that some parties may disagree is not, for example, a reason to exclude likely dissenting practitioners from a committee of doctors. In the same way, it is not a reason to exclude patients from healthcare policy discussions. Moreover, the fact that patients and providers may not always agree is not a reason to close our minds to collaborating when we do.”

“We should approach such disagreement on policy and projects the way we should in any sector. That is, give relevant stakeholders of all perspectives a fair opportunity to be heard. And, where possible, try not to speak for others in lieu of them speaking for themselves first.”

“It’s worthwhile looking for points of common ground, and building upon those. More often than we acknowledge, patients and doctors are really advocating for the same outcomes. But too often we don’t take the time to really analyse where the crux of disagreement actually lies.”

“So it’s worth trying to identify when disagreement is about what the end goal should be, and when it’s about how we should best get there. That helps to clarify how the points of difference, and points to potential solutions.”

“In cases where viewpoints really do differ substantially, all parties should have the opportunity to make a case for their proposal, then let the policy and law makers evaluate those on their merits.”

Is there a will to cooperate?

Morris: “Because I don’t work for or represent a consumer organisation, I can’t speak for them with any authority. However, I will say that in my experience, there is reflexive and entrenched suspicion on both sides.”

“If we find that the aims of doctors’ and patients’ organisations are so distinct as to be deemed incompatible, we should be re-evaluating those aims urgently

“Patient organisations are concerned about being seen to endorse a situation in which doctors’ organisations dominate and speak ‘on behalf of’ patients. Because such situations hark back to unhelpful, dictatorial hierarchies which have traditionally silenced the patient voice.”

“On the other hand, doctors’ organisations have expressed concern that patients do not understand the complexities of health policy and systems, the challenges faced by practitioners, and the broader potential consequences of proposals.”

“But in my experience, if and where these issues exist, it is in working together that parties learn from each about about how they can all do better. And the result is stronger organisations, and a more robust campaign.”

“It is healthy for organisations to remain vigilant about being faithful to their purpose and mandates. However, if we find that the aims of doctors and patient organisations are so distinct as to be deemed incompatible, we should be re-evaluating those aims urgently.”

“As a patient advocate, I would be delighted to have the opportunity to campaign alongside doctors and their organisations when appropriate. And indeed, on several issues I have done just that.”

“I have the privilege of working alongside many doctors in my role, who have taught me a great deal about the everyday realities of being a doctor. And I am a better advocate as a result. I hope that working with patients and advocate affords doctors similar insights.”

Tribalism, the real enemy in healthcare

Five doctors went duck hunting one day. Included in the group were a general practitioner, a paediatrician, a psychiatrist, a surgeon and a pathologist.

After a time, a bird came winging overhead. The first to react was the GP who raised his shotgun, but then hesitated. “I’m not quite sure it’s a duck,” he said, “I think that I will have to get a second opinion.” And of course by that time, the bird was long gone.

Another bird appeared in the sky thereafter. This time, the paediatrician drew a bead on it. He too, however, was unsure if it was really a duck in his sights and besides, it might have babies. “I’ll have to do some more investigations,” he muttered, as the creature made good its escape.

Next to spy a bird flying was the sharp-eyed psychiatrist. Shotgun shouldered, he was more certain of his intended prey’s identity. “Now, I know it’s a duck, but does it know it’s a duck?” The fortunate bird disappeared while the fellow wrestled with this dilemma.

Finally, a fourth fowl sped past and this time the surgeon’s weapon pointed skywards. BOOM!!

The surgeon lowered his smoking gun and turned nonchalantly to the pathologist beside him and said: “Go see if that was a duck, will you?”

Source: Nursing Fun

What’s great about this joke is not just the stereotype behaviour of the five doctors – which most people working in healthcare immediately will recognise. What is wonderful here, is the different disciplines doing some team building. They may not be very efficient as a team yet, and they could have picked a different activity, but at least they have found a common goal: hunting.

In the real world of medicine we sometimes seem to have forgotten our purpose. The inconvenient truth is that we’re often acting as a dysfunctional team where every member’s main goal is to finish their own little task, and where other team members and disciplines are sometimes regarded as ‘the enemy’.

A while back I was privileged to hear Dr Victoria Brazil speak at a conference of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners in Brisbane. Dr Brazil is an emergency physician and passionate about the topic of medical tribalism. Instead of the more primitive tribal behaviour – characterised by hostility towards other tribes and the unwillingness to take responsibility for a bigger cause – we should move to a kinder tribalism driven by mission and purpose, without common enemies, she argues.

Dr Brazil reminds us that we cannot achieve the best patient outcome without other disciplines. Building relationships, communicating and networking are the key to success. This sounds obvious but it’s not very often that we make time to sit down and have a yarn with members of other teams.

You don’t have to go duck hunting together, but next time you talk to someone belonging to a different tribe, maybe just introduce yourself and ask how they’re going.

If you would like to know more about this fascinating topic: In the video below Dr Brazil, who is also a gifted speaker, addresses a room full of medical tribes (but with a common interest in emergency medicine). She explains how we can overcome the dark side of medical tribalism. Enjoy.