Who is serving whom?

What are we going to do with the data once we have collected it? Often, when I ask this question, the answer is vague.

In the race for big data the purpose has sometimes been forgotten. It’s like doing research without formulating a question first.

I wonder who is serving whom: Are IT systems supporting health providers or are we increasingly following rigid templates and blindly harvesting information for reasons we often don’t even understand?

It is time to pause and gain a better understanding of where we want to go. How can data and IT best support patient care and public health into the future?

What can stakeholders agree on with regards to secondary use of data? Where are the trap doors?

The outcome should always be a win-win, or mutual benefit.

Is the medical software industry holding us back?

There’s a Dutch theory called ‘De wet van de remmende voorsprong’ which, according to Wikipedia, translates as ‘The law of the handicap of a head start’. The theory suggests that an initial head start by an individual, group or company often results in stagnation due to lack of competition or growth stimuli. This may eventually lead to losing pole position.

General practice was one of the first fully digitalised, more or less paperless, medical disciplines in Australia. The question is, are GP software packages keeping up with the times or is the profession at risk of falling behind and being overtaking by others?

Good job

Overall I am satisfied with the desktop software I use to look after my patients. It does the basics very well such as recording patient demographics and medical history, medication management, printing scripts and investigation referrals.

It also checks if medications agree with each other and if the patient happens to be allergic to a new pill I am about to prescribe.

But compared to, let’s say, ten years ago there haven’t been any breakthrough innovations. Sure, we can now check the national My Health Record and upload a shared health summary, but there’s also a lot to wish for.

GP Desktop Software
Are GP desktop software vendors holding general practice back?

We’re still relying on the good old fax machine and over the years I have seen more and more third-party software solutions appear on our system to perform tasks the desktop software can’t. Occasionally these packages clash with each other or slow the practice system down.

The wish list

Here’s a list of 7 basic things that should be included in all GP desktop software. I believe it would improve patient care and satisfaction.

  1. I’d love to have the option to communicate securely with patients and other providers, asynchronously or via video link.
  2. Our patients should be able to send digital health data or electronic script requests via a secure connection.
  3. An online appointments booking system.
  4. GPs should be able to send scripts electronically to the pharmacy.
  5. It would be really nice if the software would help us to write (and send) smart electronic referrals by automatically inserting the data required by the specialty or provider we are referring our patients to.
  6. Decision support tools offer benefits such as increased diagnostic accuracy and a reduction of unnecessary tests.
  7. We also need integrated data analysis and data cleansing tools to help improve the quality of general practice data, so it can be better used for in-practice quality improvement processes.

What’s on your wish list?

Rest In Peace, BEACH

To raise new questions, new possibilities, to regard old problems from a new angle, requires creative imagination and marks real advance in science ~ Albert Einstein.

Here’s a little quiz. True or false? (Answers below)

  1. Herpes Zoster (shingles) in Australia continues to increase over time.
  2. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease imposes a high level of societal and financial burden on the community in Australia.
  3. Of all GP consultations conducted in a language other than English, more than eighty percent are conducted by multilingual GPs who speak the patient’s language.
  4. For 15% of people living with schizophrenia in Australia, ongoing management is provided by their GP alone.

Before you scroll down to the answers, you need to know that the common source of this information is the research program BEACH, short for Bettering the Evaluation of Care in Health.

For the past eighteen years BEACH has provided us with important information to improve patient care and primary care services in Australia.

Government funding for the research program will cease which means BEACH will be closed. The government will also stop funding the Primary Health Care Research & Information Services (PCHRIS).

This has caused another shock wave through Australian general practice and primary care.

A sad day for patients, GPs and health providers.

Answers: 1 true, 2 true, 3 true, 4 false (this should be 30-40%)