How to control the settings for secondary use of your My Health Record data

Now that over ninety per cent of Australians has a My Health Record, we need to start using it. That also means becoming familiar with the dashboard and settings. Most people are not aware that they can control who sees what information in their record.

For example, you have the option to switch off secondary use of data. Secondary use is when third parties use your health information for purposes not directly related to your care.

This includes public health policy development and research – but also many other purposes. If you want to know more, read my blog post about this topic.

When a new MyHR record is created, your data will automatically be shared for other purposes. If you do not want this, you need to click the ‘do not participate’ button.

Unfortunately, this button is not available under the ‘privacy & access’ tab where it should be so it may be hard to find. Look for the button at the bottom of the ‘profile & settings’ tab (see screenshot below).

Secondary use of My Health record data

It is your choice to share or not share your data. There is also a helpful video available with instructions on how to control settings for secondary use of data.

3 reasons to avoid Skype for telehealth

Is Skype safe for a clinical consultation? In June last year, the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners said in their publication RACGP advice on Skype: “There is currently no clear evidence to suggest that Skype is unsuitable for clinical use”.

This year however, new information came to light suggesting that Skype, owned by Microsoft, may not be as safe as we thought. Here are three reasons why you should be careful to use Skype as a professional video conferencing tool:

  • Skype is not encrypted from end-to-end. Microsoft can intercept information transmitted via Skype.
  • Skype tells the world where users are by exposing IP addresses. This allows criminals to target cyber attacks.
  • The US National Security Agency (NSA) can listen in and watch Skype chats with their data collection program Prism.

Interestingly, Skype’s privacy policy states:

Skype is committed to respecting your privacy and the confidentiality of your personal data, traffic data and communications content.

But this, it seems, needs to be taken with a pinch of salt. The Guardian reported that Microsoft “worked with the FBI this year to allow the NSA easier access via Prism to its cloud storage service SkyDrive, which now has more than 250 million users worldwide.”

The big question of course is: If US government agencies are listening in on our video chats, what other governments and organisations are collecting our online data?

6 issues that need to be addressed to make the PCEHR a success

Have you made up your mind? Are you going to sign up for the personally controlled e-health record (PCEHR)?

I believe six issues need to be sorted out as soon as possible to make it easier for consumers to take part:

  • Confidential patient data is potentially unsecure in the PCEHR Govt cloud
  • Too much risk & liability for health professionals
  • Uploaded PCEHR data will be used by Govt for other purposes incl data mining
  • Up to 5 minutes extra per patient is needed to upload and manage online PCEHR data
  • Longer consults create higher fees & increased costs for patients
  • More red tape, difficult to understand rules and regulations

It’s got a lot of potential, but the devil is in the detail.

PCEHR