5 ingredients for effective collaboration

Collaboration can be very rewarding. It is often talked about but not easy to achieve, and it doesn’t always make the top of the priority list.

Although it’s not the solution to everything, effective collaboration can be a source of satisfaction and has the potential to make work, and life, more fun. Of course, collaboration does not mean that we have to agree on everything.

I’d like to share some thoughts on the ‘ingredients’ of successful collaboration:

#1: Letting go of control

No one is as smart as all of us, said Ken Blanchard. It’s ok to not have all the answers. In collaborative cultures outcomes are largely dependent on organic group processes. It is important to empower others and trust in the wisdom of the group and diversity of thought.

#2: Celebrating diversity

Interesting things happen when people bring different backgrounds, disciplines, skills and ideas to the table. We need to be open to a dialogue that celebrates differences. This is not always easy as our tendency is to engage with like-minded people.

Diversity improves decision-making as it stimulates critical evaluation and prevents groupthink. Diversity also means accepting that we can have differences of opinion.

#3: Aiming for mutual benefit

In collaborative cultures mutually beneficial solutions become more important than winning and personal gain. We need to attend to the needs of all parties and not just our own.

Consensus improves the quality of decision-making through genuinly addressing individual concerns. Asking questions and finding out what outcome the other party needs is key to finding common ground for agreement.

#4: Formulating shared values or goals

Often we want to jump to the ‘how’ without having explored the ‘why’. Universal values are motivating! They answer the why question and are the reason we get out of bed in the morning. Providing excellent care to our patients is an example of a universal value/goal most of us share.

#5: Building relationships

If we focus on outcomes without investing in relationships, there is a good chance that we will fail. Building trust and relationships are key components of effective collaboration. This is never a once-off tick-box exercise but should be an ongoing activity.

This post was originally published on BridgeBuilders.

6 new social media road rules

I joined Twitter back in 2011. In those days, the social media platform felt like taking a leisurely stroll around the old village, stopping along the way to have a friendly chat with locals.

We had Sunday night Twitter chats, discussing anything to do with social media and healthcare in Australia and New Zealand. There were patients, doctors, nurses, midwives, pharmacists and others happily chatting with each other, sharing information and offering support, following professional codes of conduct and rules of courtesy.

It was an inspiring place, there at the Twitter village square.

In recent years, however, social media has become a ubiquitous part of the mainstream. As a result of the rapid growth of various platforms and the number of users and networks, it now feels like driving at high speed on a five-lane freeway.

I still occasionally see the locals from the village in their fast cars, but there’s no time to chat. I usually get distracted by the billboards or the other drivers, overtaking, blowing the horn and, not seldom, making angry gestures.

Interestingly, we all seem to be copying each other’s behaviors on the social media highways. And, somehow, I often end up in the lane for doctors. There is also a lane for patients, pharmacists, midwives and so on.

Although the doctors in my lane don’t always see eye to eye, we often agree on things like the abominable road conditions or the dangers of a fast-approaching storm. And, not infrequently, we get frustrated about the drivers in the other lanes, especially when they cross the double white unbroken dividing line or, heaven forbid, end up in our lane.

I miss the village square. The diversity of people and ideas was refreshing. There was more time, more tolerance, more curiosity and more kindness. It is not surprising that social media can be bad for our mental health.

On the other hand, social media still has a lot to offer. There are many amazing, inspiring and funny people out there.

I was asked to write about the do’s and don’ts of social media, but I’m not the highway patrol. I have instead listed six simple things to remind myself of what I should already know when I’m participating in the traffic on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn or any other social media network.

(I have admittedly, had a look at the website of the Royal Automobile Club of Queensland for inspiration)

Here are six new social media road rules:

  1. Remain calm and relaxed
  2. Drive defensively and make allowances for errors by others
  3. Adopt a ‘share the road’ rather than ‘me first’ approach to driving
  4. Use the horn sparingly and only as a warning device
  5. Leave unpleasant encounters or delays in the past and concentrate on the rest of the trip
  6. Don’t try to police other road users’ behaviours

Edwin can often be found driving in the slow lane on Twitter at @EdwinKruysThis post was originally published on NewsGP. Road rules advice originally by RACQ.

Talking Governance: Why board diversity is important for success

Should the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) be lead by GPs only or a more diverse mix of directors? In the lead up to the College’s general meeting on May 30 board diversity has been one of the topics of debate.

The composition of boards and councils of other Colleges has been used as an example but, more important than what has been happening so far, is where we will be in 5, 10 or 20 years time. A new Governance Model should prepare the RACGP for future challenges. This requires more than just looking at what other Colleges do today.

The Trump response

When President Donald Trump ordered a closure of the US borders to prevent Muslim refugees and visitors entering the country, the Scientific American republished How Diversity Makes Us Smarter by Katherine Phillips, Professor of Leadership and Ethics and senior vice dean at Columbia Business School.

“Simply being exposed to diversity can change the way you think”

Professor Phillips argues that diverse teams are more innovative than homogenous teams, referring to a body of research by organisational scientists, psychologists, sociologists, economists and demographers.

“Diversity enhances creativity”, she says. “It encourages the search for novel information and perspectives, leading to better decision-making and problem solving. Diversity can improve the bottom line of companies and lead to unfettered discoveries and breakthrough innovations. Even simply being exposed to diversity can change the way you think.”

Not-for-profit boards

Vernetta Walker of BoardSource, an organisation based in Washington supporting nonprofit board leadership, says that achieving diversity on a nonprofit board is a challenging but doable and essential task.

“Don’t assume everyone agrees about what diversity and inclusion mean for the board,” she says. “Before asking ‘How do we become more diverse?’ boards must ask ‘Why do we need to become diverse?’

“Boards with a good gender balance perform better”

The evidence to answer that question is coming largely from the field of gender diversity. Louise Pocock, Deputy Executive Director of the Australian Governance Leadership Centre says that several studies have shown that boards with a good gender balance perform better.

Although board diversity often refers to gender, momentum is growing that diversity is also about other aspects such as ethnic and cultural background, age, education, skills, experience and boardroom behaviours and attitudes.

“A board comprised of diverse individuals brings a variety of life experiences, capabilities and strengths to the boardroom,” she says. “There is greater diversity of thought and a broader range of insights, perspectives and views in relation to issues affecting the organisation.”

“Diversity of thought may, in turn, encourage more open-mindedness in the boardroom, help generate cognitive conflict and facilitate problem solving, and also foster greater creativity and innovation. It also reduces the risk of ‘group think’ – where board members’ efforts to achieve consensus overrides their ability to identify and realistically appraise alternative ideas or options in relation to the organisation.”

Reluctance to adapt

Sally Freeman and Peter Nash from KPMG Australia state that boards of tomorrow need to be nimble, and responsive to the rapidly changing environment.

The authors say that, in order to create board diversity it is important for boards to recognise their conscious and unconscious biases. The key to good diversity is getting the mix right to achieve a shared purpose – overcoming biases and assumptions – and then, how that mix is managed, which requires a chair who is adept at facilitating open and robust discussion. Boards don’t make a huge number of key decisions but the ones they do make need to consider the breadth of challenges and opportunities faced by the business.”

“Sometimes boards are reluctant to adapt”

“However, sometimes boards are reluctant to adapt. These are the boards that struggle to see how current social, environmental, geo-political or technological issues could impact their business – at times only recognising the consequences once it’s too late. There is further evolution required for those boards who take the view that these issues are ‘not real’ or do not impact their organisation. Diversity can assist with surviving this evolution.”

Long-term success

Suzanne Ardagh from the Australian Institute of Company Directors (AICD) says that board diversity is a component of a strong performing board and that research now shows that high performing boards are very much aware of how their board composition could contribute or detract from robust discussions, decision-making and ultimately, performance.

She says that a mindset shift is required to create more diversity on boards and that this is essential to set up an organisation for the future and for long-term success. “I would urge Chairs and Directors to make that change which society is seeking. Boards need to become more inclusive of the wide and diverse community that we are – it is an imperative that becomes more acute every day.”

“A mindset shift is required to create more diversity on boards”

Vanetta Walker advises boards to expand diversity, but limit board size. “Many organisations identify their needs for inclusiveness and diversity only to confront the biggest challenge of all: how to fill all those needs without weighing down the board with too many members. When a board is too large, some members may feel disengaged, and decision-making can become cumbersome.”

“Diversity really impacts decision-making, and good decision-making is good governance,” says CH2M Hill board member Georgia Nelson (see video). “Having diverse folks around the table really drives you to let go of conventional thinking. You get out of traditional boundaries and you begin to think about things in a different way, and by doing that innovation grows and prospers.”

Disclaimer and disclosure notice. Follow me on Twitter: @EdwinKruys.

Sources: