2×5 questions you should ask your doctor

There are a 5 simple questions you can ask your doctor about tests and 5 questions about the treatment, to be better informed, and get the outcome you want.

Testing

  1. How certain or uncertain are you about my diagnosis?
  2. Are further tests required?
  3. If so, how good are the tests?
  4. Are there risks or downsides to the tests?
  5. Is testing necessary or are there other options?

Treatment

  1. What treatments options do I have?
  2. How successful is the treatment?
  3. Are there risks attached to the treatment? Eg adverse reactions, interactions with other medications, antibiotic resistance, bleeding, infection.
  4. Is the treatment necessary or are there other options? Eg wait, try lifestyle changes first, do further tests, see another doctor.
  5. Is there anything else I need to know about the treatment? Eg how to administer, when to come back, how to prevent this from happening again.

5 things to remember before a doctor’s visit

It happens regularly: people visit a doctor but have difficulty providing essential details about their health.

Sometimes people incorrectly assume that all information is always at my fingertips. I don’t blame them; the healthcare sector is complicated and going to the doctor is understandably not everybody’s cup of tea.

And in all fairness, it’s not easy to remember when we had our last tetanus vaccination or in which year we were in the local hospital.

I hope the following five tips will help to make the most of your doctor’s visit.

1. Gather information

Write facts down, together with your questions. The doctor may ask a few things such as: when you first noticed the problem, what made it better or worse, and what your main concerns are. Make sure you know what your questions and expectations are.

  • Tip: Feel free to do your research on the Internet and check your findings with the doctor. Remember that online health information may not be applicable to you.

2. Allow enough time

If you want to discuss a complicated issue or a few problems, consider booking a long appointment to avoid running out of time.

3. Ask a friend or family member to join you

Having someone with you is helpful in many ways: to ask questions, to remember what has been discussed, for support and to give you a lift to and from the clinic if you are unwell.

4. Keep a record of all your past and present health problems

This is important. Doctors always need background information about your health. Don’t automatically assume the doctor always has all the required information.

  • Tip: Your own record could include a list of your medical problems, diagnoses, hospital admissions, operations, medications, vaccinations, allergies to or side effects from certain medications, products or food. Outcomes of important tests are always helpful. Keep a paper record or store the information in a safe place on your computer, phone or preferably electronic health record.

5. Never leave things to the last moment

A doctor’s visit just before a holiday trip, or on a Friday afternoon may cause problems – for example if your doctor needs to do more tests or the recommended medications are not available in the pharmacy. Sometimes a last-minute visit is unavoidable but often good planning goes a long way!