3 reasons to avoid Skype for telehealth

Is Skype safe for a clinical consultation? In June last year, the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners said in their publication RACGP advice on Skype: “There is currently no clear evidence to suggest that Skype is unsuitable for clinical use”.

This year however, new information came to light suggesting that Skype, owned by Microsoft, may not be as safe as we thought. Here are three reasons why you should be careful to use Skype as a professional video conferencing tool:

  • Skype is not encrypted from end-to-end. Microsoft can intercept information transmitted via Skype.
  • Skype tells the world where users are by exposing IP addresses. This allows criminals to target cyber attacks.
  • The US National Security Agency (NSA) can listen in and watch Skype chats with their data collection program Prism.

Interestingly, Skype’s privacy policy states:

Skype is committed to respecting your privacy and the confidentiality of your personal data, traffic data and communications content.

But this, it seems, needs to be taken with a pinch of salt. The Guardian reported that Microsoft “worked with the FBI this year to allow the NSA easier access via Prism to its cloud storage service SkyDrive, which now has more than 250 million users worldwide.”

The big question of course is: If US government agencies are listening in on our video chats, what other governments and organisations are collecting our online data?