10 podcasts for GPs (and their patients)

I always enjoy a good podcast. There is something appealing about listening to people’s stories via the cloud – and at a convenient time and place. I usually listen in the car on the way to work.

In 2014 I posted 6 great podcasts for primary care, one of the most visited articles on this blog. As podcasting seems to be more popular then ever and new podcasts for family doctors have been launched since my last post, it is time for an update (October 2018).

So here is my top 10. Since I’ve been involved with the BridgeBuilders podcast (shamelessly placed @ no.4) my respect for podcasters has grown even more; it takes many hours to edit one episode.

Click on the iTunes or SoundCloud logo to listen, and feel free to share your favourites in the comments section. Big thanks to all podcasters – keep going!

#1: The Good GP

The Good GP

The Good GP has been around since September 2016 and has grown into one of the most popular education podcast ‘for busy GPs’, hosted by Western Australian GPs Dr Tim Koh and Dr Sean Stevens, in collaboration with RACGP WA.

Guests are GPs or other specialists and a range of mainly medical topics is covered, for example: acute pain, allergies, immunisations, the future of general practice, euthanasia and the registrar -supervisor relationship.

Listen on iTunes or SoundCloud

#2: The GP Show

This is another popular medical education podcast – hosted by Queensland GP and medical educator Dr Sam Manger.

Sam interviews guests covering a wide variety of topics including case studies and guideline reviews. The podcast is aimed general practitioners, family physicians, other specialists, allied health, nurses, registrars/residents, medical students and anybody interested in health, science and medicine.

Listen on iTunes or Libsyn

#3: Just a GP

Just a GP is a popular newcomer in 2018, run in collaboration with RACGP New South Wales. Hosts Dr Ashlea Broomfield, Dr Charlotte Hespe and Dr Rebekah Hoffman discuss leadership, quality in clinical practice, self care and wellbeing, difficult consultations, starting or running a private practice and GP research.

They explore the layered complexities with each other and other GPs with expertise in these areas. In each episode they share a favourite resource or clinical pearl.

Listen on iTunes or SoundCloud

#4: BridgeBuilders

Hosted by Dr Edwin Kruys, Dr Ashlea Broomfield and Dr Jaspreet Saini, the themes of the BridgeBuilders podcast are collaboration in healthcare, fragmentation, team care and working together to the benefit of our patients.

A wide variety of guests, including some of our healthcare and thought leaders from e.g. the RACGP, ACRRM, Consumers Health Forum (CHF) and the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia (PSA), give their view on trust, integrated care, quality care, leadership and what needs to happen to make Australian healthcare an even better connected place.

The BridgeBuilders podcast was launched in 2018.

Listen on iTunes or SoundCloud

#5: GP Sceptics

GP ScepticsSuperstar GPs Dr Justin Coleman and Dr Liz Sturgiss team up to ‘dissect, analyse and sometimes trash’ medical research relevant to GPs.

A common theme in their broadcasts is the influence of the pharmaceutical industry and other big corporates on doctors and our health.

Liz and Justin have a good sense of humour and recommend their podcast to ‘sceptical clinicians and their patients’.

Listen on iTunes or SoundCloud

#6: The Medical Journal of Australia

The Medical Journal of Australia (MJA) needs no introduction. Listen to interviews with leading health professionals and authors of MJA articles.

Listen on iTunes

#7: Broomedocs Podcast

Broome GP & emergency doctor Casey Parker has been podcasting since 2012. He discusses topics related to emergency medicine and (procedural) general practice . In the Broomedocs journal club relevant research studies are critically appraised, often with guests.

Listen on iTunes

#8: The Health Report

The Health ReportThe Health Report by Norman Swan and other ABC reporters features health topics such as ‘fishy fish oil’, insomnia, asthma, chiropractic controversies, the cranberry myth and lyme disease. Often several national and international guest discuss various topics in one episode.

Listen on iTunes

#9: BS without the BS

Best Science Medicine PodcastThe Best Science (BS) medicine podcast is a Canadian show which critically examines the evidence behind commons drug therapies. GP and associate professor Michael Allan and professor James McCormack present many myth busters and topics relevant to general practice, such as the treatment of back pain, osteoporosis and common cold.

Listen on iTunes

#10: Inside Health 

A BBC podcast discussing several topics per episode with UK GP Dr Mark Porter, demystifying myths about everything health: vitamins, supplements, obesity, smoking, organ donation, and much more.

Listen on iTunes or SoundCloud

 

An earlier version of this post was published in March 2017.

The video that made doctors cry

The video that made doctors cry
‘The Good GP’ campaign highlights the vital role GPs have in looking after Australians. Image source: RACGP

The first video of a national awareness campaign highlighting the value of general practice has brought tears to the eyes of many GPs. The amazing video from the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) certainly creates an emotional response.

The clip starts in the seventies, when home pregnancy tests were not widely available. The young, fresh GP is visibly happy to bring the good news to a couple in his consulting room (“You have a baby on the way”). There is no computer in the room, lots of paperwork on the doctor’s desk, and we see furniture and filing cabinets from times gone by.

As we follow the couple and the doctor over the years, the consulting room changes too. If you look closely (admittedly this may be of interest to medicos only) you will see a beautiful old mercury sphygmomanometer on the trolley. Computers begin to appear on the desk. Time flies in the video; in a matter of seconds the GP and his patients age and new family members enter the consulting room.

The lifelong journey

Towards the end one of the children has become a mother. The GP, now with grey hair, says to her “we have quite the journey ahead of us,” as he gets up from his chair with the visible difficulty of an older man.

Indeed, sharing the journey through life is one of the aspects that sets the GP apart from other disciplines. And just like in the video we’re there for the minor ailments – the nits – as well as the big and often emotional life events, such as a cancer diagnosis or the death of a spouse. I think the video brings this message across very well and that may be why it triggers an emotional response.

But the video also contains another message. Observant viewers will have noticed that the GP has two framed certificates hanging on the wall at the beginning of the clip and, as time moves on, more certificates follow.

The importance of education and learning gained through fellowship of the RACGP is a key message of the campaign. A voiceover at the end tells us: “The good GP is with the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners, because the good GP never stops learning.”

Criticism

There is of course, as always, criticism. Some have commented that telling patients they have to do something may not be the most effective way to encourage change – like smoking cessation. Good GPs have a conversation with their patients. Others have mentioned the video doesn’t reflect our multicultural society or the gender diversity in medicine.

Fellows of the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (ACRRM) may rightly say that they too are good GPs. And lastly, there seems to be a disconnect between the clip and the message about lifelong-learning at the end. It may be easier to brand general practice than a GP college.

I believe some of the criticism will be addressed in future campaign material – but it is also good not to lose sight of the bigger picture. The campaign aims to improve the recognition of GPs and general practice. If it’s as successful as the RACGP’s You’ve been targeted campaign, the promotion of general practice will benefit all those working in primary care, and more importantly, our patients.

Strong general practice

Personally I hope the campaign opens the eyes of some politicians. Australians rate their doctors in the top-3 of most honest and trusted professions and they visit the GP on average 5-6 times per year. GPs are good value when it comes to spending tax payers money: The average GP consultation costs $50, compared to for example $400-600 per service in a hospital emergency department.

It is a good idea to reduce waste and duplication in healthcare, but poorly targeted cuts and freezes will do more harm than good to the health of Australians. We must also reduce the amount of red tape and stay away from more bureaucracy, like NHS-style revalidation – so doctors can look after their patients instead.

The success of a campaign depends on the people who support it. In a video message directed at doctors RACGP president Dr Frank Jones said: “Talk to your patients and key people in your community about the importance of general practice. Our training and the accreditation standards are why the good GP never stops learning.”

The video touched the hearts of many GPs, but in the end it’s the impact on patients that matters most. I hope its positivity will be contagious. Watch it and share it.

Follow me on Twitter: @EdwinKruysDisclaimer and disclosure notice.

6 great podcasts for primary care

 

6 great podcasts

Here are six free podcasts made with tender loving care by a variety of people and organisations. I enjoy listening to these online broadcasts because they are relevant to my daily work in general practice. I download the episodes on my iPhone at home when I’m on WiFi – and listen on the way to work.

The first two podcasts are aimed at health professionals and mainstream audience, the others are more suitable for health professionals only. There are many other awesome podcasts out there; if you know of any in particular, please share your tip in the comment section below.

Do you want to know how to set up podcasts or how to get started recording your own? Here is a good explanation by GP Dr Tim Leeuwenburg.

#1: Health Report (ABC)

In-depth quality reports by Norman Swan and other ABC reporters on topics such as breast cancer & screening, contraceptive options other than the pill and science topics like the future of DNA-sequencing. Well put together with often several national and international experts in one episode.

Audience: Mainstream and health professionals. Episode duration: 28 minutes. Download on iTunes

#2: Inside Health (BBC)

Inside Health
Inside Health with UK GP Dr Mark Porter

Great podcast discussing a few topics per episode – with UK GP Dr Mark Porter. Demystifying myths about vitamins, glucosamine, testosterone, statins, e-cigarettes and much more. One episode about the doctor’s gut feeling inspired me to write this blog post.

Audience: Mainstream and health professionals. Episode duration: 28 minutes. Download on iTunes

# 3: Broomedocs Podcast (Dr Casey Parker)

High quality grassroots podcast by Australian GP & ED Doctor Casey Parker. All sorts of topics relevant to general practice and emergency medicine, such as resuscitation techniques, snake bites, vitamin D deficiency, contraception, overdiagnosis and suicide. The podcast could do with a professional iTunes logo to make it stand out on mobile devices amid other podcasts.

Audience: Health professionals. Episode duration: 15-50 minutes. Download on iTunes

#4: Best Science Medicine Podcast – BS without the BS (Dr James MCormack and Dr Michael Allen)

Entertaining Canadian show discussing evidence-based drug therapy. Lots of myth busters and many topics relevant to general practice such as vaccines, osteoporosis and the treatment of common cold.

Audience: Health professionals (GPs). Episode duration: 20-40 minutes. Download on iTunes

#5: Australian Family Physician Audio (RACGP)

Interesting interviews with authors of articles in Australian Family Physician, the journal of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners. The podcast is a great way to follow the journal if you don’t have the time to read everything, or if you want to hear more from the authors. Episodes are presented by various AFP editors, and include topics like multimorbidity, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple myeloma, SSRIs & adolescents, and obesity in general practice.

The quality of the recordings varies between episodes. It is occasionally necessary to read the article to gain full understanding of the topic. The podcast needs a professional iTunes logo to make it recognisable on mobile devices amid other podcasts.

Audience: Health professionals (GPs). Episode duration: 10-30 minutes. Download on iTunes

#6: HBR Ideacast (Harvard Business Review)

HBR IdeacastManagement and business skills are not taught sufficiently during the medical training, even though doctors often find themselves in leadership positions. The Harvard Business Review podcast features tips and ideas by inspirational leaders – ready to be implemented at work. Food for thought for business owners and (practice) managers.

Listen to topics like: how to spread excellence when opening another practice, and online training videos for new staff members. Want more tips? Download the free Harvard Business Review management tip of the day app on your phone.

Audience: Managers & business owners. Episode duration: 10-20 minutes. Download on iTunes