Don’t google yourself?

“Don’t google yourself,” is the advice from a Medical Defence Organisation in the Medical Journal of Australia, “because you’ll probably find something that you don’t like.”

That’s fascinating. It’s a bit like screening for cancer in people without symptoms. Sometimes screening tests are abnormal even when there is no cancer. This is more likely to happen when the probability of cancer is low.

The topic of the MJA article was reputation management. So I wonder, if an MDO tells us not to screen our online reputation, does that mean the probability of finding something we don’t like is low? Or is it because we can’t do anything about the unpleasant things we may find?

The same article mentions:

But the past 12 months have seen medical defence organisations (MDOs) experience a sharp rise in concerns about growing online threats to individual doctors’ and practice reputations.

In that case, telling doctors not to Google themselves is like saying to someone with a strong family history of diabetes: “Don’t test for diabetes, because you’ll probably find an elevated blood sugar level.”

When I blogged about the MJA article earlier this week, Dr Ewen McPhee commented:

Interested to know why you wouldn’t google yourself, how will that protect your reputation?

I think he is right. Isn’t it in the interest of the doctor and the practice to know what’s out there on the web? Especially since the concerns about online reputation are rising? In this case it is also right to screen because there is a ‘treatment’ available.

Google has a simple tool, called Me on the web. It can be activated via the Google dashboard, and the service lets you know when new online information appears about you or your practice. If you have concerns about the information or you feel it is incorrect, the content can in some cases be removed with Google’s help.

Find more information about how to manage your online reputation with Google.

Social media in healthcare: Do’s and don’ts

Facebook in health care
Image: pixabay.com

‘Reputation management’ was the topic of an article in the careers-section of this month’s Medical Journal of Australia. As I have blogged about reputation management before I was asked a few questions about the way my practice has used Facebook.

I think Facebook and other social media have the potential to improve communication with our patients and colleagues and make healthcare more transparent – if used wisely of course.

Unfortunately the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA) has scared the healthcare community with their social media guidelines. Doctors are now being told by medical defence organisations to be even more careful with social media, but I’m not sure I agree with the advice given.

Do’s & don’ts

Here are the do’s and don’ts as mentioned in the MJA article:

  • “Do allow likes and direct messaging on the practice Facebook page, but don’t allow comments. This will avoid any dangers associated with comments classed as testimonials by AHPRA. It also avoids problems such as bullying that may occur when comments are made about other comments.”
  • “Don’t respond to negative remarks online, as it risks falling into the category of unprofessional conduct if brought before the medical board.”
  • “Don’t befriend patients on Facebook if you are a metropolitan practice, Avant’s Sophie Pennington advises, so as to keep some professional distance. She says that in regional and rural areas it can be unrealistic to have this separation.”
  • “Do link your Facebook page to your website, LinkedIn and any other profiles you have set up online. This will help to ensure that these options appear higher on the search-page listings when others look for your name.”
  • “Don’t google yourself!”

Negative vs positive feedback

I think negative comments online are a great opportunity to discuss hot topics (such as bulk billing and doctors shortages) and to engage with the community in a meaningful way. Positive feedback by patients is wonderful and should not be discouraged, as long as it’s not used as a way to advertise health services.

Health practitioners should be supported to communicate safely online. But not allowing Facebook comments is defeating the purpose of social media.