Shared decision-making is more than asking what patients want

Medical students are sometimes surprised that we don’t always follow the guidelines they have learned in medical school and instead use the patient as our guide when making decisions. Shared decision-making involves exploring patient preferences and what is important to them.

This sounds obvious but it’s actually not easy. As I said before in this blog post, I’m not sure I can always answer the 5 Choosing Wisely ‘questions to ask your doctor’, which form the basis of shared decision-making.

Apparently many doctors believe they already do this when they don’t. For example, a survey of US-based health practitioners observed high confidence in the face of limited understanding. There are many myths about shared decision-making (the 2-minute video below explains the most common ones).

Shared decision-making is more than asking what a patient wants. It also includes providing information about the pros and cons of available options, including the level of evidence around risks and benefits of tests and treatments. If I and many of my colleagues find this challenging, how do patients experience it?

5 questions to ask your doctor (before you get any test or treatment)

The National Prescribing Service (NPS) has made an interesting list of 5 questions patients should ask their doctors. The aim is to be well informed about the benefits and potential harm before you undergo medical tests, treatments, and procedures.

I think the list is useful and I’d encourage people to ask these questions. At the same time I suspect I will not be able to answer all the questions. For example, I don’t know the costs of all available tests, and the exact risks of certain interventions is something I may have to look up.

I have been told NPS is planning to develop resources for doctors so they can better help their patients with these queries. This would indeed be helpful. But in the meantime, feel free to ask! I hope it will lead to less unnecessary interventions.

Here are the 5 questions to ask your doctor before you get any test, treatment, or procedure:

5 questions NPS

Source: Choosing Wisely Australia

Participation – the secret sauce of health care

The previous Christmas parties at work were always nice. We sat down and were served a nice dinner. There was nice live music. We were fed and entertained – what more can you ask for?

Last year our management team took a different approach. We were not fed. We had to prepare our own food: Select the toppings for our pizza and bake it in the wood fired pizza oven. We waited patiently in line. We were the chefs.

There was no band. We had to sing ourselves – on stage. We were the entertainment. There were sumo suits; there was a gladiator ring. It was the best Christmas party ever.

Participation is fun. It creates a sense of ownership, responsibility and improves team spirit. That’s why social media works. Social media empowers. We have become participants instead of spectators.

This is how it should be in health care. I love it how some of my patients take ownership of their health. They are actively engaged, do research, ask questions and understand their treatment. As a doctor I’m not telling them what to do, I’m just part of their team.

Participation is the secret sauce. As health care professionals we must do everything we can to encourage participation.