Is value based healthcare devaluing care?

There’s a lot to say for high value care. High value care is healthcare that generates a large amount of benefit for patients and the community compared to the resources invested. But there are also concerns.

Value based healthcare links outcomes with costs: ‘Value’ is derived from measuring health outcomes against the cost of delivering these outcomes. Although it makes sense to fund care that gives us the greatest health benefits, some argue that ‘value’ is more than outcomes.

Dr Jan Kremer is a Dutch Professor in patient-centred innovation and has a passion for patient-focused quality and innovation. In a recent blog post he questioned value based healthcare, stating that value has a different meaning to different people – ranging from efficiency to solidarity, equity and quality of life.

The right things

In healthcare, he said, it is not just about doing things right, but also about doing the right things. The former can be measured, the latter is about decision-making which can’t always be quantified. After all, we can achieve the desired outcomes by doing the wrong thing.

Indeed, a focus on outcomes only tells part of the story. Care may have value for people even when the outcomes are not good.

It is impossible to capture the complexity of healthcare through linear mechanical quality systems, like measuring isolated single-disease parameters. As Goodhart’s law says: ‘When a measure becomes a target, it ceases to be a good measure’.

Models that focus on outcomes often result in only modest improvements, usually not long-lasting and sometimes reducing quality of care for health conditions that are not targeted.

These models can negatively affect the patient-doctor relationship and take away the passion and enthusiasm of care providers.

Learning together

Everyone wants value in healthcare. Professor Kremer said we must be careful with anglo-saxon models that measure everything. But there are alternatives.

In the Netherlands, learning together based on shared values, and measuring less, has resulted in important successes. According to Professor Kremer outcome data has been helpful in the development of Dutch high value care models, but it never controlled the process.

Less is more

I was asked to address the Committee for Economic Development of Australia (CEDA) about how to place health consumers at the centre of future healthcare reform and the delivery of health services. ‘Less is more’ is the presentation I gave on 2 November in Brisbane.

I would like to take you with me this morning to my practice in the Sunshine Coast hinterlands and introduce two of my patients. For privacy reasons their names and details have been altered.

To refer or not to refer?

My first patient is Susan, age 24. Susan requests a referral letter to a plastic surgeon. When asked she explains that she thinks her breasts are too small, and that she wants a breast enlargement.

What would you do if you were in my shoes? Can I please see a show of hands: who would refer Susan? Who wouldn’t?

This is of course about shared decision-making. I noticed Susan was slightly uneasy, she clearly felt uncomfortable about something, so I decided to explore her request a bit further. During our conversation Susan broke down in tears and told me that it was actually her boyfriend who thought her breasts weren’t the right size.

Our conversation about relationships and body image went on for over 20 minutes. Susan decided she needed some time to think things over and talk to good friends, and that she would come back if she needed further assistance.

Susan could also have gone online to an automated referral website.

Issues with online referral services

This is a screenshot from a real Australian online referral service. Here, Susan would have had to fill out a brief online questionnaire, pay with her credit card and she would have received a referral instantly via email.

But Susan decided to make an appointment with me instead and left without a referral. She could have ended up with implants she didn’t really want or need – and a large bill.

Never just about a script

My next patient this morning is John. He comes for a repeat prescription for blood pressure pills. When he sits down the first thing he says is: “Doc, I can do my banking online, why can’t I just send an email to request my scripts?”

John has a blood pressure machine but hasn’t been able to use it recently as he has been overseas.

I take his blood pressure which is very high. I notice John has gained weight since his last visit. He tells me he has a new job and works overseas as a plant operator for a mining project– and hasn’t had much physical exercise. He suddenly also remembers that he needs boosters for his travel vaccinations. As I check the records I notice his blood tests are overdue.

Although John came in for a script it looks like there are several health issues he may want some help with. Email contact would have been more convenient for John – but some problems would have gone unnoticed if he hadn’t come in.

In my job it’s never just about a script or a referral. Opportunistic screening and preventive care are key elements that make general practice effective.

At the same time we must ofcourse find ways to increase the uptake of digital health solutions. Telehealth, video consultations and asynchronous consultations with the usual GP practice have many advantages including potentially reducing travel and waiting times for our patients.

Unfortunately, one of the main reasons for the low uptake is that Medicare currently subsidises face-to-face GP care only.

High value care

Good doctors know when not to ask for a test, when not to prescribe antibiotics or opiates, when not to refer and when not to operate.

There are some great initiatives appearing that promote ‘less is more’ healthcare such as ‘Choosing Wisely Australia’. This initiative brings consumers and health providers together to improve the quality of healthcare through reducing tests, treatments and procedures that provide no benefit or, in some cases, lead to harm.

On the other hand we are seeing more disruptive, commercial, mainly profit-driven healthcare: Competitive markets built around growth, turnover and profits, and as we all know corporate medicine can drive resources away from patient care to meet market priorities.

After Hours presentations
Source: Department of Health and Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

This chart shows what happened after the rapid expansion of after hours home visiting services operating outside the more traditional medical deputising approach.

The two bottom lines show the explosion of visits by after hours home visiting doctors, funded by Medicare, with no meaningful reduction of emergency department visits – the top line.

Although the service is convenient for patients, the question has rightly been asked: does it represent high value care?

Health Care Homes

A solution suggested a few years ago by the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) was the patient-centred medical home, which concentrates care and funding for a patient in one preferred general practice.

The model was meant to enhance patient-centered, holistic care. It included for example:

  • Support for coordination of care, to improve the patient-journey through the various parts of the healthcare system;
  • Support for practices providing a comprehensive range of services locally;
  • A complexity loading which would support practices to respond to socioeconomic and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status, rural status and the age profile of their local community, and reduce health inequalities.

This concept was reviewed, adjusted, modified, tweaked and tuned but what the Department of Health eventually came up with was a very different model; a model that simply pays practices a capitated lump sum for patients with chronic health conditions, and removes the fee-for-service system for chronic care – without significant extra investment to keep Australians well and in the community.

The department’s version of the ‘healthcare home model,’ which doesn’t necessarily solve our main problems such as poorly integrated care, is being trialled but the profession is lukewarm at most.

Pay-for-performance

What about performance indicators, targets and pay-for-performance? This seems to be a hot topic in Australia. It is tempting to pay doctors when their patient loses weight, has a lower blood pressure or improves sugar levels.

Pay-for-performance schemes have been tried elsewhere in the world but the results are disappointing.

For example, performance management has gone wrong in the British Quality and Outcome Framework pay-for-performance system and has resulted in:

  • only modest improvements in quality, often not long-lasting
  • decreased quality of care for conditions not prioritised by the pay-for-performance system
  • no reduction of premature mortality
  • loss of the patient-centeredness of care
  • reduced trust in the doctor-patient relationship
  • reduced access to GPs
  • decreased doctor morale, and
  • billions of pounds implementation costs

As Goodhart’s law says: “When a measure becomes a target, it ceases to be a good measure.”

Primary care is a complex system. Quality improvement processes that are traditionally applied to linear mechanical systems like isolated single-disease care, are not very useful for complex systems.

Slow down

We know that countries with a strong primary care system have better health outcomes and more efficient health systems. An important ingredient is continuity of care by the same general practice team.

It involves empowering patients to drive their own care as well as improvements in the healthcare system. We need to listen to our patients. This may also mean that we need to slow down. Less is more.

The RACGP believes that when GPs can spend more time with their patients, this enhances continuity and quality of care and will result in less prescribing, less pathology tests, less referrals and, importantly, less hospital presentations.

Government health spending
Source: AIHW

This chart, based on data from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, shows that General Practice services represent less than 9% of total government recurrent expenditure on health. Less than 9%…

In comparison, expenditure for hospitals represent 46%. Are we really doing everything we can to keep people well, in the community and out of hospital?

4 take-home messages

I have four take-home messages for you today:

#1: Take the good, leave the bad

We need to test new models of care in the Australian context, but we must avoid making the mistakes others have made before us, such as the UK performance payment schemes.

#2: Slow down

Let’s slow down. Allow patients & doctors to spend time together when needed. High turnover or profit-driven healthcare is not healthy for patients, doctors and our health budget.

#3: Convenience ≠ high value

We have to find a balance between convenience and value. Convenience is important, but it is never just about getting a referral letter or a script.

#4: Keep people well in the community

If we want to make a difference we must strengthen healthcare in the community, when people are relatively well, not just in hospitals when they’re terribly unwell. Rechanneling funding from hospital to primary care would achieve this.

Take home messages

Where did our health data go?

Data is like garbage, you’d better know what you are going to do with it before you collect it ~ Unknown

It took a while, but the Department of Health is now inviting submissions about the various ways digital health information in the national My Health Record (MyHR) should, and could, be used.

By law information in the MyHR can be collected, used and disclosed ‘for any purpose.’ This ‘secondary use’ of health data includes purposes other than the primary use of delivering healthcare to patients.

The consultation paper is not an easy-read and I wonder how many people will be able to make heads or tails of the document – but then again it is a complex subject.

Nevertheless, secondary use of health data seems to make sense in certain cases. As the paper states:

“Secondary use of health data has the potential to enhance future healthcare experiences for patients by enabling the expansion of knowledge about disease and appropriate treatments, strengthening the understanding about effectiveness and efficiency of service delivery, supporting public health and security goals, and assisting providers in meeting consumer needs

Risks and red flags

There are risks. For example, I would be concerned if insurance companies or the pharmaceutical industry would get access to the data or if the information would not be de-identified.

The consultation paper also mentions performance management of providers, and driving ‘more competitive markets’. These are red flags for many health providers because there is little evidence these purposes will benefit patient care.

For example, performance management has gone wrong in the British Quality and Outcome Framework pay-for-performance system and has resulted in:

  • only modest improvements in quality, often not long-lasting
  • decreased quality of care for conditions not part of the pay-for-performance system
  • no reduction of premature mortality
  • loss of the person-centeredness of care
  • reduced trust in the doctor-patient relationship
  • loss of continuity of care and less effective primary care
  • decreased doctors morale
  • billions of pounds implementation costs

According to the consultation paper it is ‘not the intention’ to use MyHR data to determine remuneration or the appropriateness of rebate claiming by healthcare providers.

Interestingly, a similar discussion is currently happening around the changes to the quality improvement incentive payments (PIP) to general practices and the proposed requirement to hand over patient data to Primary Health Networks without, at this stage, a clear data framework.

Research & public health

It seems reasonable to use the information in the MyHR for research or public health purposes with the aim to improve health outcomes. The access, release, usage and storage of the data should obviously be safeguarded by proper governance principles.

A good idea mentioned in the paper is a public register showing which organisations or researchers have requested data, for what purposes, what they have found by using the data and any subsequent publications.

I hope the MyHR health data will never be used for e.g.:

  • commercial purposes including by insurance companies
  • performance management or pay-for-performance systems
  • sharing or creating identifiable information for example via integration with other sources
  • low value research

The My Health Record is far from perfect but still has much to offer. Unfortunately it has an image problem and its value proposition will need to be clearly communicated to health professionals. There are also several loose ends that need fixing, such as workflow challenges and the medicolegal issues around uploading and accessing of pathology and diagnostic imaging reports.

Knowing exactly what MyHR data will be used for and by whom will be an important factor for many in deciding whether to participate and at what level. ‘Where did our health data go?’ is a question health professionals and consumers should never have to ask.

You can complete the public survey here. Submissions must be received no later than midnight Friday 17th November, 2017.

The joys of pay for performance

The joys of pay for performance
Image: Pixabay.com
“G’day doc. I’m a little embarrassed to bring this up but…”

“No worries, you know you can be honest here. Let’s check your blood pressure first. It was a bit high last time.”

“Oh… ok. Not dangerously high I hope?”

“Well it was just above the benchmark, which is concerning. As you know I don’t get paid if I don’t look after your pressure. Let’s see… 140 over 90. Uh oh. I’m afraid we have to bump up your medications.”

“But doc, could it be stress? I wanted to tell you that…”

“Stress, stress… That’s all well and good but Medicare doesn’t care what the cause is. If it’s too high I miss out. And if I miss out you miss out, you know that don’t you? We also have to talk about your weight target. As I’ve told you before, if you don’t lose those extra pounds our practice cannot afford to look after you any longer.”

“Are you listening to me? John and I broke up last night. I’m a mess!”

“I’m sorry to say that there’s no incentive payment for counselling anymore. Please do me a favour and book in for your pap smear on the way out. Last time you were late and we missed the deadline for our quarterly Medicare bonuses. We don’t want that to happen again do we?”

 Follow me on Twitter: @EdwinKruysDisclaimer and disclosure notice.