Pharmacists and doctors: Let’s change the script

This week saw another low point in the communication and relationships between health groups in Australia. We must find a better way.

It began after the release of a report from the Queensland parliamentary inquiry into pharmacy, which recommends that pharmacists should be able to prescribe and dispense ‘low-risk emergency and repeat prescriptions’ and ‘low risk vaccinations’, subject to consultation with a ‘13HEALTH GP’ or checking ‘the patient’s medical record’ through MyHealthRecord.

Medical groups including the AMA and RACGP indicated they will not support the recommendations. This is hardly surprising as the results of the deliberations by the parliamentary committee led by Chair Aaron Harper MP are not based on mutually agreed principles or a collaborative care model.

Although the report repeatedly mentions a shared prescribing model, the recommendations, if implemented, will not result in effective collaboration. For example, checking the MyHealthRecord (which is not always available or complete) or calling a health-line can hardly be seen as supporting team care and collaboration with treating doctors. Cooperation between pharmacists and medical teams should be more than a box ticking exercise.

I believe we can do better than this.

Community pharmacists feel that their scope of practice is restricted and that they can contribute in a more meaningful way to patient care. Medical groups are concerned that more prescribers can lead to fragmentation of care and poor health outcomes, especially in the absence of meaningful collaboration.

Both arguments are valid and should be explored further. There is always a better way but this requires a willingness to work together and find mutually agreed solutions. Indeed, not an easy task, but we can’t leave this to a group of parliamentarians.

I’d also like to think we are able to move beyond strongly worded media releases, open letters, lobbying and political donations.

On a positive note, it was good to see that the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia (PSA) recently organised a low-key summit between medical and pharmacy groups to discuss patient safety. PSA president Shane Jackson said that the summit will seek to develop a set of principles to support respectful and collaborative practice between pharmacists and doctors.

Reaffirming these principles is a useful exercise and a good place to start. My colleague Dr Ashlea Broomfield and I spoke with Shane Jackson about collaborative models of care (listen to the BridgeBuilders podcast here). Although doctors and pharmacists may never agree on everything, which is absolutely fine, we must find a better way forward in the interest of our patients.

How safe is the patient safety net?

How safe is the patient safety net?

In the ‘Blogging on Demand’ series you get to choose the topic. If you have a great idea you want the world to know about, feel free to contact me. Perth GP Dr Jacquie Garton-Smith proposes a change to the PBS safety net to protect vulnerable patients.

“One thing that my patients with chronic disease on lower incomes find difficult,” says Dr Garton-Smith, “is that they have to pay for all their medications until they hit the safety net. Even if people are only paying the lower rate for scripts, it adds up if they are on a number of medications. I have seen it affect compliance at the beginning of the year when they have to decide which medications they need most.”

The general patient safety net threshold is currently $1,453.90, and the concessional threshold $366. When someone or their family’s total co-payments reach this amount, they only have to pay the concessional co-payment amount of $6.10 until the end of the calendar year. Concessional card holders get standard PBS scripts for free after they reach the threshold.

The PBS co-payment and safety net amounts, effective from 1 January 2015:
General patient co-payment: $37.70
Concessional co-payment: $6.10
General safety net threshold: $1,453.90
Concessional safety net threshold: $366.00.

A safer solution

Garton-Smith: “Loading the costs into a few months of the year and then being free the rest of the year for concessional card holders is concerning. My patients tell me the safety net is supposed to help them but doesn’t – until it kicks in. For someone who has diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, arthritis, reflux, depression and sometimes osteoporosis, asthma or COPD, you can see the impact. This is not an unusual scenario.”

“It would be so much easier if the cost could be spread out over the year for people likely to hit the safety net. It would also prevent people attempting to stock-pile at the end of the year. I realise most people don’t get more than 5 scripts a month but those who need to are often managing serious health problems.”

Medication adherence 

Research has shown that when co-payments for medications increase, more people stop their treatment. This includes essential preventive medications, and as a result more visits to the doctor and hospital may be required.

Associate professor Michael Ortiz said in Australian Prescriber: “Some have argued that greater cost sharing does not undermine overall patient health because patients facing rising costs will reduce their consumption of perceived non-essential medications more than their consumption of essential drugs. However, ‘preventive’ drugs are different, because not all patients understand the long-term benefits of taking medicines for conditions such as hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia.”

“Some of my patients need to delay filling scripts they see as less essential

Garton-Smith: “A patient I have seen needs to buy more than ten medications every month at a cost of $85. Sometimes there are extra costs, for example if he needs antibiotics. On a single disability pension he gets $840.20 per fortnight, so approximately 5% of his income is spent on scripts until he reaches the safety net threshold, generally by May. Even though he gets a lot of prescriptions filled just before the end of December, he usually needs to delay filling scripts that he sees as less essential at the start of the year.”

Professor Michael Ortiz in Australian Prescriber: “The current approach to PBS savings is that the Government takes most of the cost savings, but increases co-payments and safety net thresholds each year in line with inflation. Increasing co-payments reduces medication adherence and ultimately may compromise the care of some patients.”

Thanks to Dr Jacquie Garton-Smith for the topic suggestion.

Follow me on Twitter: @EdwinKruys. Disclaimer and disclosure notice.

Is the new eRx electronic prescription service beneficial to consumers?

Is the new eRx electronic prescription service beneficial to consumers?
Image: pixabay.com

About ten years ago I did a locum in an innovative GP practice in The Netherlands. When prescribing medications, the computer system allowed me to either print the script and hand it to my patient, or send it electronically to the pharmacy. Consumers who elected the second option, were able to collect their medications at the pharmacy twenty minutes later.

I’m not sure how secure the system was, but it was easy to use, saved a lot of paper, and prevented lost scripts and medication errors.

ePrescribing in Australia

Here in Australia doctors are printing or handwriting scripts. This month however I noticed a little QR code in the top right corner after printing a script. It took me a while to figure out what it was for: Patients can scan this code with a mobile device, submit the information electronically to the pharmacy of their choice and pick the script up on a preferred day and time.

eRx express
Source: erxexpress.com.au

The app, developed by the Fred IT Group, is called eRx Express. It can be downloaded for free on mobile devices. It seems that the benefit for health consumers is reduced waiting time at the pharmacy – which is great, especially if people have already been waiting to see their doctor.

I also have a few reservations…

First of all, consumers have to scan and send information via their smart phones, and they still need to bring in the paper script when collecting their medicines at the pharmacy. So it involves a few more steps and we’re not yet saving trees.

Second, as always, I would like to know what happens with the data during and after scanning, transmission over the internet and on the servers of the Fred IT Group and others. Is the information sold or disclosed to third parties?

It would be good if consumer details and their prescription history would not be collected or used for other purposes. But usually, when something is free, we become the product. In other words, there is often a price to pay with regards to our personal data.

The small print

So, after a little search I found this information in the patient terms and conditions and the privacy policy:

You agree that we may disclose your de-identified prescription data to selected third parties for the research and marketing purposes of those third parties.

We do not warrant (…) that any data transmissions between you and us will be secure and that any data you send us shall at all times remain secure.

We reserve the right to (…) charge for the App or service provided to you at any time and for any reason (whether stated or not).

Conclusion

As long as private or governmental organisations want control of our health data for other purposes than patient care, eHealth initiatives will not take off. Of course health consumers are free to use this service, but at the moment the benefits do not seem to outweigh the risks.