3 examples why health professionals should be online

It was an interesting week to say the least. I was so sorry to hear about the death of 21-year Eloise Parru, who accidentally took an overdose of slimming pills she purchased online. The pills contained a dangerous substance, dinitrophenol or DNP.

The amount of online advertising of drugs and medical devices is overwhelming. Unfortunately buying medications over the internet is a risky business. They can be fake, contain too much or too little of the active ingredient, or they may contain toxic chemicals. There is no doctor or pharmacist to give reliable advice on how to take the drugs and what adverse reactions to look out for.

The Therapeutic Goods Administration has an excellent website explaining the risks of buying medications on international websites. My advice: never do it.

Health blogger and founder of a best-selling health app Belle Gibson was a very influential woman – but unfortunately she made things up. In a recent interview she confessed that she never had cancer and wasn’t cured by natural remedies. The media are all over her, and so far she has not apologised for misleading her followers. I wonder what is going on here.

Online health scams are numerous. As the wellness industry is largely unregulated, I’m afraid this will not change.

forced penetration
Image: Sydney Morning Herald

The Australian vaccination skeptics network was in the news again after it compared vaccinations to ‘forced penetration’. A shocking image (see above) was posted on the Facebook page of the anti-vaccination group to convey their controversial message. It has caused a public outrage, which is probably a good thing. I don’t think it has done the group any good.

A while ago I blogged about the 6 warning signs that online health information may be unreliable and as I said before: don’t rely on one source of information and always ask a registered doctor or health professional if you’re not sure.

I believe we need more health professionals and health organisations promoting reliable, evidence-based information in the online space – including social media – to counterbalance the many untrustworthy health messages.

What do you think?