10 podcasts for GPs (and their patients)

I always enjoy a good podcast. There is something appealing about listening to people’s stories via the cloud – and at a convenient time and place. I usually listen in the car on the way to work.

In 2014 I posted 6 great podcasts for primary care, one of the most visited articles on this blog. As podcasting seems to be more popular then ever and new podcasts for family doctors have been launched since my last post, it is time for an update (October 2018).

So here is my top 10. Since I’ve been involved with the BridgeBuilders podcast (shamelessly placed @ no.4) my respect for podcasters has grown even more; it takes many hours to edit one episode.

Click on the iTunes or SoundCloud logo to listen, and feel free to share your favourites in the comments section. Big thanks to all podcasters – keep going!

#1: The Good GP

The Good GP

The Good GP has been around since September 2016 and has grown into one of the most popular education podcast ‘for busy GPs’, hosted by Western Australian GPs Dr Tim Koh and Dr Sean Stevens, in collaboration with RACGP WA.

Guests are GPs or other specialists and a range of mainly medical topics is covered, for example: acute pain, allergies, immunisations, the future of general practice, euthanasia and the registrar -supervisor relationship.

Listen on iTunes or SoundCloud

#2: The GP Show

This is another popular medical education podcast – hosted by Queensland GP and medical educator Dr Sam Manger.

Sam interviews guests covering a wide variety of topics including case studies and guideline reviews. The podcast is aimed general practitioners, family physicians, other specialists, allied health, nurses, registrars/residents, medical students and anybody interested in health, science and medicine.

Listen on iTunes or Libsyn

#3: Just a GP

Just a GP is a popular newcomer in 2018, run in collaboration with RACGP New South Wales. Hosts Dr Ashlea Broomfield, Dr Charlotte Hespe and Dr Rebekah Hoffman discuss leadership, quality in clinical practice, self care and wellbeing, difficult consultations, starting or running a private practice and GP research.

They explore the layered complexities with each other and other GPs with expertise in these areas. In each episode they share a favourite resource or clinical pearl.

Listen on iTunes or SoundCloud

#4: BridgeBuilders

Hosted by Dr Edwin Kruys, Dr Ashlea Broomfield and Dr Jaspreet Saini, the themes of the BridgeBuilders podcast are collaboration in healthcare, fragmentation, team care and working together to the benefit of our patients.

A wide variety of guests, including some of our healthcare and thought leaders from e.g. the RACGP, ACRRM, Consumers Health Forum (CHF) and the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia (PSA), give their view on trust, integrated care, quality care, leadership and what needs to happen to make Australian healthcare an even better connected place.

The BridgeBuilders podcast was launched in 2018.

Listen on iTunes or SoundCloud

#5: GP Sceptics

GP ScepticsSuperstar GPs Dr Justin Coleman and Dr Liz Sturgiss team up to ‘dissect, analyse and sometimes trash’ medical research relevant to GPs.

A common theme in their broadcasts is the influence of the pharmaceutical industry and other big corporates on doctors and our health.

Liz and Justin have a good sense of humour and recommend their podcast to ‘sceptical clinicians and their patients’.

Listen on iTunes or SoundCloud

#6: The Medical Journal of Australia

The Medical Journal of Australia (MJA) needs no introduction. Listen to interviews with leading health professionals and authors of MJA articles.

Listen on iTunes

#7: Broomedocs Podcast

Broome GP & emergency doctor Casey Parker has been podcasting since 2012. He discusses topics related to emergency medicine and (procedural) general practice . In the Broomedocs journal club relevant research studies are critically appraised, often with guests.

Listen on iTunes

#8: The Health Report

The Health ReportThe Health Report by Norman Swan and other ABC reporters features health topics such as ‘fishy fish oil’, insomnia, asthma, chiropractic controversies, the cranberry myth and lyme disease. Often several national and international guest discuss various topics in one episode.

Listen on iTunes

#9: BS without the BS

Best Science Medicine PodcastThe Best Science (BS) medicine podcast is a Canadian show which critically examines the evidence behind commons drug therapies. GP and associate professor Michael Allan and professor James McCormack present many myth busters and topics relevant to general practice, such as the treatment of back pain, osteoporosis and common cold.

Listen on iTunes

#10: Inside Health 

A BBC podcast discussing several topics per episode with UK GP Dr Mark Porter, demystifying myths about everything health: vitamins, supplements, obesity, smoking, organ donation, and much more.

Listen on iTunes or SoundCloud

An earlier version of this post was published in March 2017.

Two wonderful videos featuring rural doctors and their patients

 

The passionate country doctors featuring in these videos with their patients are great examples for rural general practice. Warning: After watching the interviews you may feel the sudden urge to pack your bags and move to the country.

Dr Ken Wanguhu: “Being a GP has taught me that there is a lot more to medicine than disease… It goes beyond the disease to the patient and their family and to the community, and that’s general practice.”

The second video features Dr Mel Considine and her patient Phil from rural South Australia. Phil: “And the first thing I remember was this lovely lady leaning over me, and she said ‘I’m Doctor Mel, the duty doctor today, and I’m here to look after you.'”

Everybody has an opinion about their GP

Do you know that situation – usually at a party – when someone tells you what they do for a living, and mention a cool sounding job description like ‘product innovation manager’ or ‘advertising account executive’? I always want to know: what does that mean and what do you actually do?

Well, people never ask me what I do when I say I’m a GP. Instead, they usually tell me what their GP does. Or did. Or said.

Everybody always knows what I do, and that’s not surprising because the Australian general practice statistics are mind-blowing: Over 134 million GP consultations take place each year. Every year almost 9 out of 10 Australians make at least one contact with a general practitioner.

Professor Max Kamien said in the latest BEACH study:

“Mothers, children, the elderly and those with chronic conditions, such as diabetes, asthma and hypertension, have many more contacts than that. As a result of these personal contacts everyone has a view about general practice. Ministers of Health have been known to base their views about general practice on their contact with their own GP.

I’m privileged to have a job that’s smack-bang in the middle of life. One could indeed argue that we’re specialists in life, as we deal with just about everything: mental health, paediatrics, cancer, skin disorders, respiratory problems, grief, heart failure, domestic violence, emergencies, pregnancy, end-of-life care, immunisations, screening… you name it.

The latests RACGP commercial tells the story of diversity – the diversity of GPs, their patients and their conditions. I love the commercial because it captures in 60 seconds the wide range of issues people bring to the consulting room of the family doctor.

So if you want to find out what really happens in my office, have a look at this video.

A painful topic: what doctors need to know (according to patients)

Ok, so I was wrong. I really liked the RACGP good GP television commercial. It had some flaws but I thought they were small in the grand scheme of things (see my last post). But many patient advocates did not agree and were unhappy about the lack of communication portrayed in the video.

Blogger Michelle Roger commented: “My current GP asks me what I want to do, what I think is most important and together we sort through the problem at hand and potential solutions. I feel valued and heard and trust her more knowing that she listens and knows me and my family.”

“That for me was missing in the video. It was one-sided and the patients appeared little more than props to be talked at. In fact the patients had no voice at all. A problem that still permeates a lot of medicine.”

Crockey health blog posted an article titled ‘The Good GP never stops learning: the RACGP video that made doctors cry – and patient advocates wince’. In a response to this article Irish blogger Marie Ennis-O’connor wrote on her blog: “We can’t just talk about a commitment to patient centred care – we have to live it. It is only by bridging the divide which places patient and doctor expertise on opposite sides that we can achieve more personalized and meaningful care of the patient.”

Patient blogs

I wondered why the patient opinion was so different to mine. On Twitter it was suggested to me that more doctors should read patient blogs to understand their view better. I thought that was a good idea so I asked for some recommendations and started reading.

I can tell you, it didn’t cheer me up but it was enlightening. It felt a bit like a refresher course “do’s and dont’s for doctors”. What I read was that, in the eyes of patients:

  • Doctors often don’t know how to deal with disabilities
  • Doctors sometimes blame patients for treatment failures
  • Some doctors find it hard to accept patients as experts
  • Doctors don’t always communicate well.

Now that I’ve read the blog posts I feel that I can better appreciate the patient response to the RACGP video – and I learnt a lot more along the way.

I have been given permission to share parts of these blogs and I recommend anyone who works in healthcare to read on. It may help to bridge the divide. Doctors beware: don’t expect flattery.

Empathy towards disability

Carly Findly
Carly Findlay: “Doctors need to move past the textbook and immerse themselves in the disability community to truly learn and empathise with our experiences.” Source: Carly Findly

In one of her posts writer and speaker Carly Findlay tells the story of how doctors gave up on her and told her parents to prepare for her death, and how she later met one of these doctors.

(…) “Over the Christmas holidays, I introduced myself as an adult to the dermatologist who gave me a pretty dismal prognosis as a baby. He pretended not to remember me until he told me I always had blocked ears. I think he was surprised to see me. I told him some of my achievements including how I am now educating dermatologists about my condition (something he needed when he treated me).”

(…) “Other people with Ichthyosis tell me that doctors didn’t give them a chance either. My friends have said that their parents were told they wouldn’t make it into mainstream school, that they wouldn’t have relationships or children, and that they would be social outcasts.”

(…) “The political models of disability can determine a person’s compassion and empathy towards disability. And so a doctor’s low expectations for a baby born with a disability can set the scene for their attitude through the lifespan of that patient.” (…) Doctors need to move past the textbook and immerse themselves in the disability community to truly learn and empathise with our experiences.”

Read the complete post here. Follow Carly on Twitter

Blaming patients

Caf
Caf: “I’m not sure that I truly trust any doctors, despite having a lovely GP.” Source: Rellacafa

Blogger Caf explains how doctors told her to see a psychiatrist when their attempts to treat her chronic pain failed.

“I had arrived at the appointment of the reveal, hobbling with a pair of forearm crutches. I could hardly bear any weight on the offending ankle. It didn’t take long for him to deliver his message, laced with condescension and arrogance. ‘There’s nothing wrong with your ankle. Why are you on crutches?’”

(…) “Chronic pain has been misunderstood and stigmatised for so long that many people probably don’t know what to believe. Even patients themselves often wonder if they’ve just gone crazy because their symptoms are so utterly illogical.”

Caf says that her experiences have affected her trust: “I’m not sure that I truly trust any doctors, despite having a lovely GP.”

Read the complete post here. Follow Caf on Twitter

Michelle also writes about pain in this post: “And there is a pervasive idea of the drug-seeker, seen in every patient who has chronic pain. That those who simply don’t get over pain and require ongoing pharmaceutical management are weak.”

“Friends who have used pain clinics tell stories of dismissal and blame. That they are not trying hard enough when they don’t recover, when I know the lengths they have gone to to try and alleviate their pain. And compassionate pain doctors who become the exception not the rule.”

The patient as expert

In another post she writes: “As a patient with an unusual, complex, and poorly understood disorder, 9 times out of 10 when I see a new doctor I am the expert in the room.”

(…) “I spend my spare time researching my disorders on Medline. I flip through Cochrane Reviews, and review consensus statements regularly. I read up on the drugs I’m taking and keep abreast of current research trials. On forums, I can ask questions of other patients.

“The constant fight to be heard is exhausting

Arm rash Michelle Rogers
Michelle Rogers: “I awoke to welts and rashes across my body. My pre-op information met with eye rolls, a sense that I was over-anxious, and thus completely ignored.” Source: Living with Bob (dysautonomia)

(…) “Some doctors are quite happy to acknowledge that I may know more about my disorder than they do. For example, my GP is happy for me to take the lead on my treatment needs. Even my cardiologist is happy to discuss my disorder in more of a collegiate manner, than the traditional doctor-patient relationship.”

(…) “Yet there are many others who are nothing short of dismissive. Should I dare to suggest a potential treatment or line of investigation the appointment can become adversarial. At times what I say is outright ignored.”

“Case in point my recent hospital admission. Despite having a red allergy band on my arm, sharing the information from my Allergist, and speaking to both my neurosurgeon, anaesthetist and senior nurse about my allergy to adhesives, I awoke to welts and rashes across my body. My pre-op information met with eye rolls, a sense that I was over-anxious, and thus completely ignored.”

(…) “The constant fight to be heard is exhausting. We are told that we must be our own advocates. That the future is patient-centred medicine. That rapport and making a patient feel part of the decision-making model leads to more compliance and more successful outcomes.”

New technology

Michelle: “Patients no longer live in a bubble where they are reliant upon their doctors as the only source of information. With the advent of social media and the ease of access to medical journals, patients can be as up to date, and at times, in front of their doctors, with regard to advances within their various disorders. We come empowered and informed to our appointments and have an expectation that our doctors will be equally informed or at the least, willing to listen and work with us.”

“We have an expectation that our doctors will be equally informed or at the least, willing to listen and work with us

“The medical community needs to be aware of the new ways information is being shared, especially the speed at which information can now travel. Instead of criticising patients for researching their ailments, they should instead be working with them, especially to direct them to more appropriate medically sound sources of information.”

“Patients are already distrustful of big pharma and the way research is funded. If their physicians also refuse to help them navigate these areas or are dismissive of their efforts, such distrust will also pass to them, to the detriment of both practitioner and patient.”

Read the complete post here. Follow Michelle on Twitter

Doctors who listen

Carly: “I went to hospital earlier this year. I was so sore, and a bit miserable. I saw a junior doctor, one I had not seen before. I spent an hour in the consult room, talking to her about Ichthyosis, but also my job, blogging, wedding plans, travel and the Australian Ichthyosis meet.”

“Their compassion means I am a human being first

“She said I was the first patient she’d met with Ichthyosis and she wanted to learn more than what she’d seen in the textbook. Her supervisor came in to provide further input into my treatment. Again, we talked about life, not just Ichthyosis.”

“And she told this junior doctor how lucky they are to have me as their educator. What a compliment. I am so lucky to feel empowered as a patient at my hospital. These doctors listen to me. They treat me as a person not a diagnosis. They see my potential and are proud of my achievements. Their compassion means I am a human being first.”

The video that made doctors cry

The first video of a national awareness campaign by the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) highlighting the value of general practice, has brought tears to the eyes of many GPs.

The clip starts in the seventies, when home pregnancy tests were not widely available. The young, fresh GP is visibly happy to bring the good news to a couple in his consulting room (“You have a baby on the way”). There is no computer in the room, lots of paperwork on the doctor’s desk, and we see furniture and filing cabinets from times gone by.

As we follow the couple and the doctor over the years, the consulting room changes too. If you look closely (admittedly this may be of interest to medicos only) you will see a beautiful old mercury sphygmomanometer on the trolley. Computers begin to appear on the desk. Time flies in the video; in a matter of seconds the GP and his patients age and new family members enter the consulting room.

The lifelong journey

Towards the end one of the children has become a mother. The GP, now with grey hair, says to her “we have quite the journey ahead of us,” as he gets up from his chair with the visible difficulty of an older man.

Indeed, sharing the journey through life is one of the aspects that sets the GP apart from other disciplines. And just like in the video we’re there for the minor ailments – the nits – as well as the big and often emotional life events, such as a cancer diagnosis or the death of a spouse. I think the video brings this message across very well and that may be why it triggers an emotional response.

But the video also contains another message. Observant viewers will have noticed that the GP has two framed certificates hanging on the wall at the beginning of the clip and, as time moves on, more certificates follow.

The importance of education and learning gained through fellowship of the RACGP is a key message of the campaign. A voiceover at the end tells us: “The good GP is with the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners, because the good GP never stops learning.”

Criticism

There is of course, as always, criticism. Some have commented that telling patients they have to do something may not be the most effective way to encourage change – like smoking cessation. Good GPs have a conversation with their patients. Others have mentioned the video doesn’t reflect our multicultural society or the gender diversity in medicine.

Fellows of the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (ACRRM) may rightly say that they too are good GPs. And lastly, there seems to be a disconnect between the clip and the message about lifelong-learning at the end. It may be easier to brand general practice than a GP college.

I believe some of the criticism will be addressed in future campaign material – but it is also good not to lose sight of the bigger picture. The campaign aims to improve the recognition of GPs and general practice. If it’s as successful as the RACGP’s You’ve been targeted campaign, the promotion of general practice will benefit all those working in primary care, and more importantly, our patients.

Strong general practice

Personally I hope the campaign opens the eyes of some politicians. Australians rate their doctors in the top-3 of most honest and trusted professions and they visit the GP on average 5-6 times per year. GPs are good value when it comes to spending tax payers money: The average GP consultation costs $50, compared to for example $400-600 per service in a hospital emergency department.

It is a good idea to reduce waste and duplication in healthcare, but poorly targeted cuts and freezes will do more harm than good to the health of Australians. We must also reduce the amount of red tape and stay away from more bureaucracy, like NHS-style revalidation – so doctors can look after their patients instead.

The success of a campaign depends on the people who support it. In a video message directed at doctors RACGP president Dr Frank Jones said: “Talk to your patients and key people in your community about the importance of general practice. Our training and the accreditation standards are why the good GP never stops learning.”

The video touched the hearts of many GPs, but in the end it’s the impact on patients that matters most. I hope its positivity will be contagious.